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Open AccessArticle

Crop Yield, Ferritin and Fe(II) boosted by Azospirillum brasilense (HM053) in Corn

1
Missouri Research Reactor Center, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211, USA
2
Department of Biochemistry, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211, USA
3
Chemistry Department, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211, USA
4
Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211, USA
5
Division of Plant Sciences, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Present Address: Burns & McDonnell, Inc. 425 S. Woods Mill Rd., Chesterfield, MO 63017, USA.
Present Address: Forensic Science Program, School of Criminal Justice, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA.
Agronomy 2020, 10(3), 394; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10030394
Received: 11 February 2020 / Revised: 6 March 2020 / Accepted: 10 March 2020 / Published: 14 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Role of Iron in Plant Nutrition, Growth and Metabolism)
An increasing global population of over 4.5 billion people drives increasing demand for calories—30% of which are satisfied by grain crops, such as maize. High-density farming practices have been implemented but tend to deplete the soil of essential elements resulting in lower nutritional value, notably iron, of cultivated crops. Low iron content in staple crops can contribute over time to severe, even fatal, micronutrient deficiencies. Enhancing grain iron content using post-harvest biofortification strategies can be costly. However, field inoculation using biologics like Azospirillum brasilense (HM053) can be a cost-effective alternative to improving crop nutritional value. Using ion chromatography with chemiluminescence detection, we have shown that maize seeds harvested from outdoor pot-grown plants possessed a four-fold higher iron content as ferrous iron (Fe+2) compared to non-inoculated plants. Seeds from A. brasilense HM053-inoculated plants also contained approximately 13 nmol of ferritin per ground dried weight of kernel compared to 3 nmol from non-inoculated plants. In addition, A. brasilense HM053 inoculation increased crop yield 30–50% relative to non-inoculated plants. View Full-Text
Keywords: maize; crop biofortification; iron-ferritin; plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria; Azospirillum brasilense maize; crop biofortification; iron-ferritin; plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria; Azospirillum brasilense
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MDPI and ACS Style

Scott, S.; Housh, A.; Powell, G.; Anstaett, A.; Gerheart, A.; Benoit, M.; Wilder, S.; Schueller, M.; Ferrieri, R. Crop Yield, Ferritin and Fe(II) boosted by Azospirillum brasilense (HM053) in Corn. Agronomy 2020, 10, 394. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10030394

AMA Style

Scott S, Housh A, Powell G, Anstaett A, Gerheart A, Benoit M, Wilder S, Schueller M, Ferrieri R. Crop Yield, Ferritin and Fe(II) boosted by Azospirillum brasilense (HM053) in Corn. Agronomy. 2020; 10(3):394. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10030394

Chicago/Turabian Style

Scott, Stephanie; Housh, Alexandra; Powell, Garren; Anstaett, Ashley; Gerheart, Amber; Benoit, Mary; Wilder, Stacy; Schueller, Michael; Ferrieri, Richard. 2020. "Crop Yield, Ferritin and Fe(II) boosted by Azospirillum brasilense (HM053) in Corn" Agronomy 10, no. 3: 394. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10030394

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