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Article

A Comparative Study of Organic and Conventional Management on the Rhizosphere Microbiome, Growth and Grain Quality Traits of Tritordeum

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Department of Chemistry, Life Sciences and Environmental Sustainability, University of Parma, Parco Area delle Scienze 11/A, 43124 Parma, Italy
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Department of Agronomy, Food, Natural Resources, Animals and the Environment, University of Padua, Viale dell′Università 16, Legnaro, 35020 Padua, Italy
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Open Fields s.r.l., Strada Consortile 2, Collecchio, 43044 Parma, Italy
4
Stuard Demonstration Farm, Strada Madonna dell′Aiuto 7/a, 43126 Parma, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Agronomy 2020, 10(11), 1717; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10111717
Received: 30 September 2020 / Revised: 28 October 2020 / Accepted: 3 November 2020 / Published: 5 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Organic vs. Conventional Cropping Systems)
Tritordeum is a novel hexaploid cereal derived from the cross between a wild Chilean barley species (Hordeum chilense Roem. et Schultz) and durum wheat (Triticum turgidum ssp. durum Desf.) that is potentially of great interest for human nutrition. In this study, a commercial and an experimental Tritordeum cultivar were analyzed in comparison with a reference durum wheat under conventional and organic management. We demonstrate that Tritordeum is better adapted to organic farming through an increase in the below-ground rhizosphere community of the Bacteroidetes phylum, which includes many bacteria species known to exert beneficial effects on plants, particularly for root growth. Despite a considerably lower grain yield, Tritordeum had better quality traits than durum wheat, particularly under organic farming vs. conventional management, with respect to total protein contents, high molecular weight glutenin subunits, antioxidant free phenols and nutrients (i.e., calcium, potassium, sulphur, iron, and zinc), depending on the cultivar. We conclude that Tritordeum is a promising cereal in light of its quality traits and adaptability to sustainable crop management practices, such as organic farming, although further improvement in yield potential should be pursued by breeding and by optimising the cultivation method. View Full-Text
Keywords: resilient cereals; grain quality; rhizosphere; root growth; sustainable management resilient cereals; grain quality; rhizosphere; root growth; sustainable management
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MDPI and ACS Style

Visioli, G.; Lauro, M.; Vamerali, T.; Dal Cortivo, C.; Panozzo, A.; Folloni, S.; Piazza, C.; Ranieri, R. A Comparative Study of Organic and Conventional Management on the Rhizosphere Microbiome, Growth and Grain Quality Traits of Tritordeum. Agronomy 2020, 10, 1717. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10111717

AMA Style

Visioli G, Lauro M, Vamerali T, Dal Cortivo C, Panozzo A, Folloni S, Piazza C, Ranieri R. A Comparative Study of Organic and Conventional Management on the Rhizosphere Microbiome, Growth and Grain Quality Traits of Tritordeum. Agronomy. 2020; 10(11):1717. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10111717

Chicago/Turabian Style

Visioli, Giovanna, Marta Lauro, Teofilo Vamerali, Cristian Dal Cortivo, Anna Panozzo, Silvia Folloni, Cristina Piazza, and Roberto Ranieri. 2020. "A Comparative Study of Organic and Conventional Management on the Rhizosphere Microbiome, Growth and Grain Quality Traits of Tritordeum" Agronomy 10, no. 11: 1717. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10111717

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