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Open AccessArticle

Diversity and Domestication Status of Spider Plant (Gynandropsis gynandra, L.) amongst Sociolinguistic Groups of Northern Namibia

1
Crop Science Department, Faculty of Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of Namibia, Ogongo Campus, Private Bag 5520, Oshakati, Namibia
2
Laboratory of Genetics, Horticulture and Seed Science, Faculty of Agronomic Sciences, University of Abomey-Calavi, Cotonou 999105, Benin
3
School of Agricultural, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, P.Bag X01, Scottsville, Pietermaritzburg 3209, South Africa
4
Department of Horticulture, Lilongwe University of Agriculture and Natural Resources, P.O. Box 219, Lilongwe, Malawi
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Agronomy 2020, 10(1), 56; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10010056
Received: 28 October 2019 / Revised: 7 December 2019 / Accepted: 9 December 2019 / Published: 1 January 2020

Knowledge on the diversity and domestication levels of the spider plant (Gynandropsis gynandra) has the potential to affect pre-breeding for client-preferred traits, yet information is scarce in Namibia due to limited research. We investigated indigenous knowledge on the species diversity and domestication levels in the regions of Kavango West, Ohangwena, Omusati, Oshana, and Oshikoto of northern Namibia. Semi-structured interviews involving 100 randomly selected farming households, four key informant interviews, and a focus group discussion were conducted. Descriptive and chi-square tests were conducted using IBM SPSS version 20. Out of the possible four morphotypes, the results suggested that only one with green stem and green petiole existed and was associated with soils rich in organic manure. Spider plant abundance was reported to be on the decline, due to declining soil fertility. On a scale of 0 (wild species) to 6 (highest level of domestication), an index of 1.56 was found and this implied very low domestication levels. Furthermore, the study found significant differences in the trends of domestication across the sociolinguistic groups (χ2 (12, N = 98) = 46.9, p < 0.001) and regions studied (χ2 (12, N = 100) = 47.8, p < 0.001), suggesting cultural and geographical influences. In conclusion, the findings constituted an important precedent for guiding subsequent pre-breeding efforts. View Full-Text
Keywords: pre-breeding; morphotypes; domestication index; indigenous knowledge; sociolinguistic groups; client-preferred traits pre-breeding; morphotypes; domestication index; indigenous knowledge; sociolinguistic groups; client-preferred traits
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Chataika, B.; Akundabweni, L.; Achigan-Dako, E.G.; Sibiya, J.; Kwapata, K.; Thomas, B. Diversity and Domestication Status of Spider Plant (Gynandropsis gynandra, L.) amongst Sociolinguistic Groups of Northern Namibia. Agronomy 2020, 10, 56.

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