Next Article in Journal
Strength of Flocs Formed by the Complexation of Lysozyme with Leonardite Humic Acid
Previous Article in Journal
An Improved Physical-Stochastic Model for Simulating Electrical Tree Propagation in Solid Polymeric Dielectrics
Article

3D Printing of Tunable Zero-Order Release Printlets

1
Department of Pharmaceutics, UCL School of Pharmacy, University College London, 29-39 Brunswick Square, London WC1N 1AX, UK
2
Departamento de Farmacología, Farmacia y Tecnología Farmacéutica, I+D Farma (GI-1645), Facultad de Farmacia, and Health Research Institute of Santiago de Compostela (IDIS), Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela, Spain
3
Pfizer Ltd., Drug Product Design, Discovery Park, Ramsgate Road, Sandwich CT13 9ND, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Polymers 2020, 12(8), 1769; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym12081769
Received: 8 July 2020 / Revised: 31 July 2020 / Accepted: 4 August 2020 / Published: 7 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Polymer Applications)
Zero-order release formulations are designed to release a drug at a constant rate over a prolonged time, thus reducing systemic side effects and improving patience adherence to the therapy. Such formulations are traditionally complex to manufacture, requiring multiple steps. In this work, fused deposition modeling (FDM) 3D printing was explored to prepare on-demand printlets (3D printed tablets). The design includes a prolonged release core surrounded by an insoluble shell able to provide zero-order release profiles. The effect of drug loading (10, 25, and 40% w/w paracetamol) on the mechanical and physical properties of the hot melt extruded filaments and 3D printed formulations was evaluated. Two different shell 3D designs (6 mm and 8 mm diameter apertures) together with three different core infills (100, 50, and 25%) were prepared. The formulations showed a range of zero-order release profiles spanning 16 to 48 h. The work has shown that with simple formulation design modifications, it is possible to print extended release formulations with tunable, zero-order release kinetics. Moreover, by using different infill percentages, the dose contained in the printlet can be infinitely adjusted, providing an additive manufacturing route for personalizing medicines to a patient. View Full-Text
Keywords: three dimensional printing; printing pharmaceuticals; personalized medicines; controlled release; 3D printed drug products; computer aided drug design and delivery; digital pharmaceutics; health and pharmaceutical sciences; gastrointestinal modified release drug delivery three dimensional printing; printing pharmaceuticals; personalized medicines; controlled release; 3D printed drug products; computer aided drug design and delivery; digital pharmaceutics; health and pharmaceutical sciences; gastrointestinal modified release drug delivery
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Fina, F.; Goyanes, A.; Rowland, M.; Gaisford, S.; Basit, A.W. 3D Printing of Tunable Zero-Order Release Printlets. Polymers 2020, 12, 1769. https://doi.org/10.3390/polym12081769

AMA Style

Fina F, Goyanes A, Rowland M, Gaisford S, Basit AW. 3D Printing of Tunable Zero-Order Release Printlets. Polymers. 2020; 12(8):1769. https://doi.org/10.3390/polym12081769

Chicago/Turabian Style

Fina, Fabrizio, Alvaro Goyanes, Martin Rowland, Simon Gaisford, and Abdul W. Basit 2020. "3D Printing of Tunable Zero-Order Release Printlets" Polymers 12, no. 8: 1769. https://doi.org/10.3390/polym12081769

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop