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Plasma Polymerized Allylamine—The Unique Cell-Attractive Nanolayer for Dental Implant Materials

1
Department of Cell Biology, Rostock University Medical Center, Schillingallee 69, 18057 Rostock, Germany
2
Department Life, Light & Matter, University of Rostock, Albert-Einstein-Str. 25, 18059 Rostock, Germany
3
Department of Surgery, University Medical Center Greifswald, 17475 Greifswald, Germany
4
Department of Medical Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University Medical Center Greifswald, 17475 Greifswald, Germany
5
Leibniz Institute for Plasma Science and Technology (INP), Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 2, 17489 Greifswald, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Polymers 2019, 11(6), 1004; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym11061004
Received: 18 April 2019 / Revised: 27 May 2019 / Accepted: 31 May 2019 / Published: 5 June 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plasma Processing in Polymers)
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Abstract

Biomaterials should be bioactive in stimulating the surrounding tissue to accelerate the ingrowth of permanent implants. Chemical and topographical features of the biomaterial surface affect cell physiology at the interface. A frequently asked question is whether the chemistry or the topography dominates the cell-material interaction. Recently, we demonstrated that a plasma-chemical modification using allylamine as a precursor was able to boost not only cell attachment and cell migration, but also intracellular signaling in vital cells. This microwave plasma process generated a homogenous nanolayer with randomly distributed, positively charged amino groups. In contrast, the surface of the human osteoblast is negatively charged at −15 mV due to its hyaluronan coat. As a consequence, we assumed that positive charges at the material surface—provoking electrostatic interaction forces—are attractive for the first cell encounter. This plasma-chemical nanocoating can be used for several biomaterials in orthopedic and dental implantology like titanium, titanium alloys, calcium phosphate scaffolds, and polylactide fiber meshes produced by electrospinning. In this regard, we wanted to ascertain whether plasma polymerized allylamine (PPAAm) is also suitable for increasing the attractiveness of a ceramic surface for dental implants using Yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia. View Full-Text
Keywords: plasma polymerized allylamine; zirconia; surface characteristics; XPS; water contact angle; zeta potential; cell adhesion; osteoblasts; actin cytoskeleton; cell signaling plasma polymerized allylamine; zirconia; surface characteristics; XPS; water contact angle; zeta potential; cell adhesion; osteoblasts; actin cytoskeleton; cell signaling
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Nebe, J.B.; Rebl, H.; Schlosser, M.; Staehlke, S.; Gruening, M.; Weltmann, K.-D.; Walschus, U.; Finke, B. Plasma Polymerized Allylamine—The Unique Cell-Attractive Nanolayer for Dental Implant Materials. Polymers 2019, 11, 1004.

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