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Open AccessArticle

3D Printing of Thermoresponsive Polyisocyanide (PIC) Hydrogels as Bioink and Fugitive Material for Tissue Engineering

1
Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, 141 Woloska str., 02-507 Warsaw, Poland
2
Department of Molecular Materials, Radboud Universities, Heyendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ Nijmegen, The Netherlands
3
Noviotech B.V., Molenveldlaan 43, 6523 RJ Nijmegen, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Polymers 2018, 10(5), 555; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym10050555
Received: 22 April 2018 / Revised: 10 May 2018 / Accepted: 15 May 2018 / Published: 21 May 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microgels and Hydrogels at Interfaces)
Despite the rapid and great developments in the field of 3D hydrogel printing, a major ongoing challenge is represented by the development of new processable materials that can be effectively used for bioink formulation. In this work, we present an approach to 3D deposit, a new class of fully-synthetic, biocompatible PolyIsoCyanide (PIC) hydrogels that exhibit a reverse gelation temperature close to physiological conditions (37 °C). Being fully-synthetic, PIC hydrogels are particularly attractive for tissue engineering, as their properties—such as hydrogel stiffness, polymer solubility, and gelation kinetics—can be precisely tailored according to process requirements. Here, for the first time, we demonstrate the feasibility of both 3D printing PIC hydrogels and of creating dual PIC-Gelatin MethAcrylate (GelMA) hydrogel systems. Furthermore, we propose the use of PIC as fugitive hydrogel to template structures within GelMA hydrogels. The presented approach represents a robust and valid alternative to other commercial thermosensitive systems—such as those based on Pluronic F127—for the fabrication of 3D hydrogels through additive manufacturing technologies to be used as advanced platforms in tissue engineering. View Full-Text
Keywords: thermoresponsive polymers; 3D hydrogel scaffolds; 3D bioprinting; polyisocyanide (PIC) hydrogels; dual hydrogel system thermoresponsive polymers; 3D hydrogel scaffolds; 3D bioprinting; polyisocyanide (PIC) hydrogels; dual hydrogel system
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MDPI and ACS Style

Celikkin, N.; Simó Padial, J.; Costantini, M.; Hendrikse, H.; Cohn, R.; Wilson, C.J.; Rowan, A.E.; Święszkowski, W. 3D Printing of Thermoresponsive Polyisocyanide (PIC) Hydrogels as Bioink and Fugitive Material for Tissue Engineering. Polymers 2018, 10, 555.

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