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Article

Fluorine Translational Anion Dynamics in Nanocrystalline Ceramics: SrF2-YF3 Solid Solutions

1
Christian Doppler Laboratory for Lithium Batteries, and Institute for Chemistry and Technology of Materials, Graz University of Technology (NAWI Graz), Stremayrgasse 9, 8010 Graz, Austria
2
Alistore-ERI European Research Institute, 33 rue Saint Leu, 80039 Amiens, France
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Crystals 2018, 8(3), 122; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst8030122
Received: 24 January 2018 / Revised: 1 March 2018 / Accepted: 2 March 2018 / Published: 5 March 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ceramic Conductors)
Nanostructured materials have already become an integral part of our daily life. In many applications, ion mobility decisively affects the performance of, e.g., batteries and sensors. Nanocrystalline ceramics often exhibit enhanced transport properties due to their heterogeneous structure showing crystalline (defect-rich) grains and disordered interfacial regions. In particular, anion conductivity in nonstructural binary fluorides easily exceeds that of their coarse-grained counterparts. To further increase ion dynamics, aliovalent substitution is a practical method to influence the number of (i) defect sites and (ii) the charge carrier density. Here, we used high energy-ball milling to incorporate Y 3 + ions into the cubic structure of SrF 2 . As compared to pure nanocrystalline SrF 2 the ionic conductivity of Sr 1 x Y x F 2 + x with x = 0.3 increased by 4 orders of magnitude reaching 0.8 × 10 5 S cm 1 at 450 K. We discuss the effect of YF 3 incorporation on conductivities isotherms determined by both activation energies and Arrhenius pre-factors. The enhancement seen is explained by size mismatch of the cations involved, which are forced to form a cubic crystal structure with extra F anions if x is kept smaller than 0.5. View Full-Text
Keywords: nanocrystalline ceramics; binary fluorides, ionic conductivity; ball milling; cation mixing; aliovalent substitution nanocrystalline ceramics; binary fluorides, ionic conductivity; ball milling; cation mixing; aliovalent substitution
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MDPI and ACS Style

Breuer, S.; Stanje, B.; Pregartner, V.; Lunghammer, S.; Hanzu, I.; Wilkening, M. Fluorine Translational Anion Dynamics in Nanocrystalline Ceramics: SrF2-YF3 Solid Solutions. Crystals 2018, 8, 122. https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst8030122

AMA Style

Breuer S, Stanje B, Pregartner V, Lunghammer S, Hanzu I, Wilkening M. Fluorine Translational Anion Dynamics in Nanocrystalline Ceramics: SrF2-YF3 Solid Solutions. Crystals. 2018; 8(3):122. https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst8030122

Chicago/Turabian Style

Breuer, Stefan; Stanje, Bernhard; Pregartner, Veronika; Lunghammer, Sarah; Hanzu, Ilie; Wilkening, Martin. 2018. "Fluorine Translational Anion Dynamics in Nanocrystalline Ceramics: SrF2-YF3 Solid Solutions" Crystals 8, no. 3: 122. https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst8030122

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