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Open AccessFeature PaperReview

A Review: Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy (SECM) for Visualizing the Real-Time Local Catalytic Activity

by 1,2,3 and 1,*
1
Institute of Biomedical Engineering, College of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National Yang Ming Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan
2
Department of Chemistry (Chemical Biology Division), College of Science, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan
3
Chemical Biology and Molecular Biophysics Program, Taiwan International Graduate Program, Institute of Biological Chemistry, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei 11529, Taiwan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Eric M. Gaigneaux
Catalysts 2021, 11(5), 594; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal11050594
Received: 29 March 2021 / Revised: 27 April 2021 / Accepted: 1 May 2021 / Published: 4 May 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Active Sites in Catalysts)
Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) is a powerful scanning probe technique for measuring the in situ electrochemical reactions occurring at various sample interfaces, such as the liquid-liquid, solid-liquid, and liquid-gas. The tip/probe of SECM is usually an ultramicroelectrode (UME) or a nanoelectrode that can move towards or over the sample of interest controlled by a precise motor positioning system. Remarkably, electrocatalysts play a crucial role in addressing the surge in global energy consumption by providing sustainable alternative energy sources. Therefore, the precise measurement of catalytic reactions offers profound insights for designing novel catalysts as well as for enhancing their performance. SECM proves to be an excellent tool for characterization and screening catalysts as the probe can rapidly scan along one direction over the sample array containing a large number of different compositions. These features make SECM more appealing than other conventional methodologies for assessing bulk solutions. SECM can be employed for investigating numerous catalytic reactions including the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), oxygen evolution reaction (OER), hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), water oxidation, glucose oxidation reaction (GOR), and CO2 reduction reaction (CO2RR) with high spatial resolution. Moreover, for improving the catalyst design, several SECM modes can be applied based on the catalytic reactions under evaluation. This review aims to present a brief overview of the recent applications of electrocatalysts and their kinetics as well as catalytic sites in electrochemical reactions, such as oxygen reduction, water oxidation, and methanol oxidation. View Full-Text
Keywords: scanning electrochemical microscopy; ultramicroelectrode; catalyst; electrocatalysis scanning electrochemical microscopy; ultramicroelectrode; catalyst; electrocatalysis
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MDPI and ACS Style

Preet, A.; Lin, T.-E. A Review: Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy (SECM) for Visualizing the Real-Time Local Catalytic Activity. Catalysts 2021, 11, 594. https://doi.org/10.3390/catal11050594

AMA Style

Preet A, Lin T-E. A Review: Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy (SECM) for Visualizing the Real-Time Local Catalytic Activity. Catalysts. 2021; 11(5):594. https://doi.org/10.3390/catal11050594

Chicago/Turabian Style

Preet, Anant; Lin, Tzu-En. 2021. "A Review: Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy (SECM) for Visualizing the Real-Time Local Catalytic Activity" Catalysts 11, no. 5: 594. https://doi.org/10.3390/catal11050594

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