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Targeting Reactive Oxygen Species Metabolism to Induce Myeloma Cell Death

1
Normandie University, INSERM, Université de Caen, F-14000 Caen, France
2
Université de Tours, GICC EA7501, CNRS, F-3700 Tours, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Jiri Neuzil
Cancers 2021, 13(10), 2411; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers13102411
Received: 2 April 2021 / Revised: 10 May 2021 / Accepted: 13 May 2021 / Published: 17 May 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Therapies for Hematological Cancers)
Multiple myeloma (MM) is a neoplastic disease of plasma cells, characterized by a complex array of clinical manifestations. Despite extensive efforts and progress in the care of MM patients, the disease is still fatal because of de novo or acquired resistance of malignant cells to standard chemotherapies. In turn, new therapies and/or combination therapies are urgently needed. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are unstable and highly reactive chemical molecules, able to alter the main structural components of cells, such as proteins and lipids, and thus, modifying cell fates. ROS levels are tightly controlled in normal cells both for their production and degradation. In turn, an unbalance of the redox status might be exploited to induce cell death. This is indeed the case for myeloma cells even those that are resistant, opening new perspectives for refractory or relapsed MM patients.
Multiple myeloma (MM) is a common hematological disease characterized by the accumulation of clonal malignant plasma cells in the bone marrow. Over the past two decades, new therapeutic strategies have significantly improved the treatment outcome and patients survival. Nevertheless, most MM patients relapse underlying the need of new therapeutic approaches. Plasma cells are prone to produce large amounts of immunoglobulins causing the production of intracellular ROS. Although adapted to high level of ROS, MM cells die when exposed to drugs increasing ROS production either directly or by inhibiting antioxidant enzymes. In this review, we discuss the efficacy of ROS-generating drugs for inducing MM cell death and counteracting acquired drug resistance specifically toward proteasome inhibitors. View Full-Text
Keywords: multiple myeloma; ROS; antioxidant enzyme; proteasome inhibitor; NOX; mitochondria; redox balance; OXPHOS multiple myeloma; ROS; antioxidant enzyme; proteasome inhibitor; NOX; mitochondria; redox balance; OXPHOS
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MDPI and ACS Style

Caillot, M.; Dakik, H.; Mazurier, F.; Sola, B. Targeting Reactive Oxygen Species Metabolism to Induce Myeloma Cell Death. Cancers 2021, 13, 2411. https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers13102411

AMA Style

Caillot M, Dakik H, Mazurier F, Sola B. Targeting Reactive Oxygen Species Metabolism to Induce Myeloma Cell Death. Cancers. 2021; 13(10):2411. https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers13102411

Chicago/Turabian Style

Caillot, Mélody, Hassan Dakik, Frédéric Mazurier, and Brigitte Sola. 2021. "Targeting Reactive Oxygen Species Metabolism to Induce Myeloma Cell Death" Cancers 13, no. 10: 2411. https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers13102411

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