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Article

Genetically Engineered Mouse Models of Liver Tumorigenesis Reveal a Wide Histological Spectrum of Neoplastic and Non-Neoplastic Liver Lesions

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Institute of Pathology, School of Medicine, Technical University of Munich (TUM), 81675 Munich, Germany
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Comparative Experimental Pathology, School of Medicine, Technical University of Munich (TUM), 81675 Munich, Germany
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Member of the German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Partner Site Munich, 81675 Munich, Germany
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Center for Translational Cancer Research (Transla TUM), School of Medicine, Technical University of Munich (TUM), 81675 Munich, Germany
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Institute of Molecular Oncology and Functional Genomics, School of Medicine, Technical University of Munich (TUM), 81675 Munich, Germany
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Department of Internal Medicine II, Klinikum rechts der Isar, School of Medicine, Technical University of Munich (TUM), 81675 Munich, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Cancers 2020, 12(8), 2265; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers12082265
Received: 5 July 2020 / Revised: 9 August 2020 / Accepted: 10 August 2020 / Published: 13 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Methods and Technologies Development)
Genetically engineered mouse models (GEMM) are an elegant tool to study liver carcinogenesis in vivo. Newly designed mouse models need detailed (histopathological) phenotyping when described for the first time to avoid misinterpretation and misconclusions. Many chemically induced models for hepatocarcinogenesis comprise a huge variety of histologically benign and malignant neoplastic, as well as non-neoplastic, lesions. Such comprehensive categorization data for GEMM are still missing. In this study, 874 microscopically categorized liver lesions from 369 macroscopically detected liver “tumors” from five different GEMM for liver tumorigenesis were included. The histologic spectrum of diagnosis included a wide range of both benign and malignant neoplastic (approx. 82%) and non-neoplastic (approx. 18%) lesions including hyperplasia, reactive bile duct changes or oval cell proliferations with huge variations among the various models and genetic backgrounds. Our study therefore critically demonstrates that models of liver tumorigenesis can harbor a huge variety of histopathologically distinct diagnosis and, depending on the genotype, notable variations are expectable. These findings are extremely important to warrant the correct application of GEMM in liver cancer research and clearly emphasize the role of basic histopathology as still being a crucial tool in modern biomedical research. View Full-Text
Keywords: GEMM; liver tumorigenesis; liver lesions; histology GEMM; liver tumorigenesis; liver lesions; histology
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MDPI and ACS Style

Steiger, K.; Gross, N.; Widholz, S.A.; Rad, R.; Weichert, W.; Mogler, C. Genetically Engineered Mouse Models of Liver Tumorigenesis Reveal a Wide Histological Spectrum of Neoplastic and Non-Neoplastic Liver Lesions. Cancers 2020, 12, 2265. https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers12082265

AMA Style

Steiger K, Gross N, Widholz SA, Rad R, Weichert W, Mogler C. Genetically Engineered Mouse Models of Liver Tumorigenesis Reveal a Wide Histological Spectrum of Neoplastic and Non-Neoplastic Liver Lesions. Cancers. 2020; 12(8):2265. https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers12082265

Chicago/Turabian Style

Steiger, Katja, Nina Gross, Sebastian A. Widholz, Roland Rad, Wilko Weichert, and Carolin Mogler. 2020. "Genetically Engineered Mouse Models of Liver Tumorigenesis Reveal a Wide Histological Spectrum of Neoplastic and Non-Neoplastic Liver Lesions" Cancers 12, no. 8: 2265. https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers12082265

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