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Open AccessEditor’s ChoiceArticle

Comparative In Vitro Assessment of a Range of Commercial Feed Additives with Multiple Mycotoxin Binding Claims

1
Institute for Global Food Security, Queens University Belfast, Belfast BT9 SDL, UK
2
School of Pharmacy, Queens University Belfast, Belfast BT9 7BL, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Toxins 2019, 11(11), 659; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins11110659
Received: 20 October 2019 / Revised: 5 November 2019 / Accepted: 7 November 2019 / Published: 12 November 2019
Contamination of animal feed with multiple mycotoxins is an ongoing and growing issue, as over 60% of cereal crops worldwide have been shown to be contaminated with mycotoxins. The present study was carried out to assess the efficacy of commercial feed additives sold with multi-mycotoxin binding claims. Ten feed additives were obtained and categorised into three groups based on their main composition. Their capacity to simultaneously adsorb deoxynivalenol (DON), zearalenone (ZEN), fumonisin B1 (FB1), ochratoxin A (OTA), aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) and T-2 toxin was assessed and compared using an in vitro model designed to simulate the gastrointestinal tract of a monogastric animal. Results showed that only one product (a modified yeast cell wall) effectively adsorbed more than 50% of DON, ZEN, FB1, OTA, T-2 and AFB1, in the following order: AFB1 > ZEN > T-2 > DON > OTA > FB1. The remaining products were able to moderately bind AFB1 (44–58%) but had less, or in some cases, no effect on ZEN, FB1, OTA and T-2 binding (<35%). It is important for companies producing mycotoxin binders that their products undergo rigorous trials under the conditions which best mimic the environment that they must be active in. Claims on the binding efficiency should only be made when such data has been generated. View Full-Text
Keywords: mycotoxins; animal feed; mycotoxin binders; feed safety mycotoxins; animal feed; mycotoxin binders; feed safety
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kolawole, O.; Meneely, J.; Greer, B.; Chevallier, O.; Jones, D.S.; Connolly, L.; Elliott, C. Comparative In Vitro Assessment of a Range of Commercial Feed Additives with Multiple Mycotoxin Binding Claims. Toxins 2019, 11, 659. https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins11110659

AMA Style

Kolawole O, Meneely J, Greer B, Chevallier O, Jones DS, Connolly L, Elliott C. Comparative In Vitro Assessment of a Range of Commercial Feed Additives with Multiple Mycotoxin Binding Claims. Toxins. 2019; 11(11):659. https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins11110659

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kolawole, Oluwatobi; Meneely, Julie; Greer, Brett; Chevallier, Olivier; Jones, David S.; Connolly, Lisa; Elliott, Christopher. 2019. "Comparative In Vitro Assessment of a Range of Commercial Feed Additives with Multiple Mycotoxin Binding Claims" Toxins 11, no. 11: 659. https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins11110659

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