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Toxins 2018, 10(5), 197; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins10050197

Designed Strategies for Fluorescence-Based Biosensors for the Detection of Mycotoxins

1
BAE: Biocapteurs-Analyses-Environnement, Universite de Perpignan Via Domitia, 52 Avenue Paul Alduy, 66860 Perpignan CEDEX, France
2
Biosensor Lab, Department of Chemistry, Birla Institute of Technology and Science, Pilani K. K. Birla Goa Campus, Zuarinagar, Goa 403726, India
3
Department of Chemistry, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Abbottabad 22060, Pakistan
4
Interdisciplinary Research Centre in Biomedical Materials (IRCBM), COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore 54000, Pakistan
5
School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, MVN University-Palwal, Haryana-121105, India
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 23 April 2018 / Revised: 8 May 2018 / Accepted: 8 May 2018 / Published: 11 May 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Sensors for Toxins)
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Abstract

Small molecule toxins such as mycotoxins with low molecular weight are the most widely studied biological toxins. These biological toxins are responsible for food poisoning and have the potential to be used as biological warfare agents at the toxic dose. Due to the poisonous nature of mycotoxins, effective analysis techniques for quantifying their toxicity are indispensable. In this context, biosensors have been emerged as a powerful tool to monitors toxins at extremely low level. Recently, biosensors based on fluorescence detection have attained special interest with the incorporation of nanomaterials. This review paper will focus on the development of fluorescence-based biosensors for mycotoxin detection, with particular emphasis on their design as well as properties such as sensitivity and specificity. A number of these fluorescent biosensors have shown promising results in food samples for the detection of mycotoxins, suggesting their future potential for food applications. View Full-Text
Keywords: mycotoxins; fluorescence assay; biosensors; nanomaterials; fluorescence quenching; food samples mycotoxins; fluorescence assay; biosensors; nanomaterials; fluorescence quenching; food samples
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Sharma, A.; Khan, R.; Catanante, G.; Sherazi, T.A.; Bhand, S.; Hayat, A.; Marty, J.L. Designed Strategies for Fluorescence-Based Biosensors for the Detection of Mycotoxins. Toxins 2018, 10, 197.

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