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Article

Chronic Intake of Energy Drinks and Their Sugar Free Substitution Similarly Promotes Metabolic Syndrome

1
Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, WA 6845, Australia
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Curtin Medical School, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, WA 6845, Australia
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School of Population Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, WA 6845, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Kimber L. Stanhope and Emilio Sacanella
Nutrients 2021, 13(4), 1202; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13041202
Received: 4 March 2021 / Revised: 27 March 2021 / Accepted: 31 March 2021 / Published: 6 April 2021
Energy drinks containing significant quantities of caffeine, taurine and sugar are increasingly consumed, particularly by adolescents and young adults. The putative effects of chronic ingestion of either standard energy drink, MotherTM (ED), or its sugar-free formulation (sfED) on metabolic syndrome were determined in wild-type C57BL/6J mice, in comparison to a soft drink, Coca-Cola (SD), a Western-styled diet enriched in saturated fatty acids (SFA), and a combination of SFA + ED. Following 13 weeks of intervention, mice treated with ED were hyperglycaemic and hypertriglyceridaemic, indicating higher triglyceride glucose index, which was similar to the mice maintained on SD. Surprisingly, the mice maintained on sfED also showed signs of insulin resistance with hyperglycaemia, hypertriglyceridaemia, and greater triglyceride glucose index, comparable to the ED group mice. In addition, the ED mice had greater adiposity primarily due to the increase in white adipose tissue, although the body weight was comparable to the control mice receiving only water. The mice maintained on SFA diet exhibited significantly greater weight gain, body fat, cholesterol and insulin, whilst blood glucose and triglyceride concentrations remained comparable to the control mice. Collectively, these data suggest that the consumption of both standard and sugar-free forms of energy drinks induces metabolic syndrome, particularly insulin resistance. View Full-Text
Keywords: energy drinks; artificial sweetener; metabolic syndrome; cholesterol; triglycerides; blood glucose; insulin; body fat; brown adipose tissue energy drinks; artificial sweetener; metabolic syndrome; cholesterol; triglycerides; blood glucose; insulin; body fat; brown adipose tissue
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MDPI and ACS Style

Graneri, L.T.; Mamo, J.C.L.; D’Alonzo, Z.; Lam, V.; Takechi, R. Chronic Intake of Energy Drinks and Their Sugar Free Substitution Similarly Promotes Metabolic Syndrome. Nutrients 2021, 13, 1202. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13041202

AMA Style

Graneri LT, Mamo JCL, D’Alonzo Z, Lam V, Takechi R. Chronic Intake of Energy Drinks and Their Sugar Free Substitution Similarly Promotes Metabolic Syndrome. Nutrients. 2021; 13(4):1202. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13041202

Chicago/Turabian Style

Graneri, Liam T., John C.L. Mamo, Zachary D’Alonzo, Virginie Lam, and Ryusuke Takechi. 2021. "Chronic Intake of Energy Drinks and Their Sugar Free Substitution Similarly Promotes Metabolic Syndrome" Nutrients 13, no. 4: 1202. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13041202

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