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Open AccessArticle

Quantifying Western U.S. Rangelands as Fractional Components with Multi-Resolution Remote Sensing and In Situ Data

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Arctic Slope Federal Data Solutions, contractor to U.S. Geological Survey, Earth Resources Observation and Science Center, 47914 252nd Street, Sioux Falls, SD 57198, USA
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U.S. Geological Survey, Earth Resources Observation and Science Center, 47914 252nd Street, Sioux Falls, SD 57198, USA
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Formerly U.S. Geological Survey, Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center, Snake River Field Station, Boise, ID 83706, USA
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KBR Contractor to U.S. Geological Survey, Earth Resources Observation and Science Center, 47914 252nd Street, Sioux Falls, SD 57198, USA
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Formerly U.S. Geological Survey, Fort Collins Science Center, 2150 Centre Ave # C, Fort Collins, CO 8052
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U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, National Operations Center, Denver Federal Center, Building 50, Denver, CO 80225, USA
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Remote Sens. 2020, 12(3), 412; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs12030412
Received: 23 December 2019 / Revised: 22 January 2020 / Accepted: 22 January 2020 / Published: 28 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Remote Sensing in Agriculture and Vegetation)
Quantifying western U.S. rangelands as a series of fractional components with remote sensing provides a new way to understand these changing ecosystems. Nine rangeland ecosystem components, including percent shrub, sagebrush (Artemisia), big sagebrush, herbaceous, annual herbaceous, litter, and bare ground cover, along with sagebrush and shrub heights, were quantified at 30 m resolution. Extensive ground measurements, two scales of remote sensing data from commercial high-resolution satellites and Landsat 8, and regression tree models were used to create component predictions. In the mapped area (2,993,655 km²), bare ground averaged 45.5%, shrub 15.2%, sagebrush 4.3%, big sagebrush 2.9%, herbaceous 23.0%, annual herbaceous 4.2%, and litter 15.8%. Component accuracies using independent validation across all components averaged R2 values of 0.46 and an root mean squared error (RMSE) of 10.37, and cross-validation averaged R2 values of 0.72 and an RMSE of 5.09. Component composition strongly varies by Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) level III ecoregions (n = 32): 17 are bare ground dominant, 11 herbaceous dominant, and four shrub dominant. Sagebrush physically covers 90,950 km², or 4.3%, of our study area, but is present in 883,449 km², or 41.5%, of the mapped portion of our study area. View Full-Text
Keywords: sagebrush; rangeland; fractional vegetation; shrub; bare ground; herbaceous; Landsat; remote sensing; land cover sagebrush; rangeland; fractional vegetation; shrub; bare ground; herbaceous; Landsat; remote sensing; land cover
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Rigge, M.; Homer, C.; Cleeves, L.; Meyer, D.K.; Bunde, B.; Shi, H.; Xian, G.; Schell, S.; Bobo, M. Quantifying Western U.S. Rangelands as Fractional Components with Multi-Resolution Remote Sensing and In Situ Data. Remote Sens. 2020, 12, 412.

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