Next Article in Journal
A Review of the Role of Vegetal Ecosystems in CO2 Capture
Previous Article in Journal
Research on Climate Change Policies and Rural Development in Latin America: Scope and Gaps
Open AccessArticle

Responses of Soil Seed Bank and Vegetation to the Increasing Intensity of Human Disturbance in a Semi-Arid Region of Northern China

1
Research and Development Center for Grass and Environment, Beijing Academy of Agriculture and Forestry Sciences, Beijing 100097, China
2
Department of Soil and Water Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2017, 9(10), 1837; https://doi.org/10.3390/su9101837
Received: 5 September 2017 / Revised: 27 September 2017 / Accepted: 1 October 2017 / Published: 12 October 2017
To provide more insights into the responses of the soil seed bank and vegetation to human disturbance intensity, we selected four land use types, including: native grassland (no human disturbance), abandoned artificial grassland (light human disturbance), artificial grassland (moderate human disturbance), and farmland (severe human disturbance) in a semi-arid climate of northern China. The species composition and density of the soil seed bank were measured, as well as the species composition and amount of vegetation. The native grassland had a significantly higher soil seed density and species richness than the other land use types. Moreover, the common species both in the soil seed bank and vegetation between the native grassland and other land use types gradually decreased as disturbance intensity increased. The abandoned artificial grassland and artificial grassland still had abundant soil seed banks according to their seed density (≥28.2% of the native grassland) and species richness (≥70.0% of the native grassland) to restore the vegetation. Conversely, it was hard to restore the vegetation on the farmland due to its low soil seed density (10.0% of the native grassland) and species richness (40.0% of the native grassland). In conclusion, human disturbance would generate significant negative effects on the soil seed bank in desertified regions in a semi-arid climate; however, the soil seed bank in land use types with light/moderate disturbance are more adapted to vegetation restoration compared with land use types with severe disturbance in a semi-arid region. View Full-Text
Keywords: soil seed bank; disturbance intensity; species richness; seed density; vegetation restoration soil seed bank; disturbance intensity; species richness; seed density; vegetation restoration
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Li, C.; Xiao, B.; Wang, Q.; Zheng, R.; Wu, J. Responses of Soil Seed Bank and Vegetation to the Increasing Intensity of Human Disturbance in a Semi-Arid Region of Northern China. Sustainability 2017, 9, 1837. https://doi.org/10.3390/su9101837

AMA Style

Li C, Xiao B, Wang Q, Zheng R, Wu J. Responses of Soil Seed Bank and Vegetation to the Increasing Intensity of Human Disturbance in a Semi-Arid Region of Northern China. Sustainability. 2017; 9(10):1837. https://doi.org/10.3390/su9101837

Chicago/Turabian Style

Li, Cui; Xiao, Bo; Wang, Qinghai; Zheng, Ruilun; Wu, Juying. 2017. "Responses of Soil Seed Bank and Vegetation to the Increasing Intensity of Human Disturbance in a Semi-Arid Region of Northern China" Sustainability 9, no. 10: 1837. https://doi.org/10.3390/su9101837

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop