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Article

Employable through Social Media: An Intervention Study

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Research Centre for Employability, Zuyd University of Applied Sciences, 6131 MT Sittard, The Netherlands
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Institute for Management Research, Radboud University, 6500 HK Nijmegen, The Netherlands
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Faculty of Management, Open Universiteit, 6419 AT Heerlen, The Netherlands
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Department of Marketing, Innovation and Organisation, Ghent University, 9000 Ghent, Belgium
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Business School, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062, China
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Kingston Business School, Kingston University, Kingston Upon Thames, London KT2 7LB, UK
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Faculty of Business and Economics, Heliopolis University for Sustainable Development, Cairo Governorate 11785, Egypt
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Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA), Maastricht University, 6211 LM Maastricht, The Netherlands
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Center for Strategy, Organization and Leadership, Nyenrode Business Universiteit, 3621 BG Breukelen, The Netherlands
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Santiago Melián-González
Sustainability 2021, 13(9), 5093; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13095093
Received: 1 April 2021 / Revised: 27 April 2021 / Accepted: 28 April 2021 / Published: 1 May 2021
This longitudinal, quantitative study contributes to the debate on technology-based professional development by examining the extent to which a learning (LinkedIn) intervention in a university setting affects an individual’s social media use for professional development, and the extent to which this relates to self-reported employability. In addition, we investigated how this relationship is moderated by an individual’s motivation to communicate through social media (LinkedIn). Based on social capital theory and the conservation of resources theory, we developed a set of hypotheses that were tested based on longitudinal data collected from university employees (N = 101) in middle- and high-level jobs. First, in line with our expectations, social media use for professional development was significantly higher after the learning intervention than before. Second, partially in line with our expectations, social media use for professional development was positively related with the employability dimension anticipation and optimization. Third, contrary to our expectations, motivation to communicate through social media (LinkedIn) did not have a moderating role in this relationship. We concluded that the learning intervention has the potential to foster social media use for professional development, and in turn, can contribute to individuals’ human capital in terms of their employability. Hence, the intervention that forms the core of this empirical research can be a sustainable and promising human resource management (HRM) practice that fits the human capital agenda. View Full-Text
Keywords: social media use for professional development; learning intervention study; motivation; employability; sustainable human resource management social media use for professional development; learning intervention study; motivation; employability; sustainable human resource management
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MDPI and ACS Style

Habets, O.; Van der Heijden, B.; Ramzy, O.; Stoffers, J.; Peters, P. Employable through Social Media: An Intervention Study. Sustainability 2021, 13, 5093. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13095093

AMA Style

Habets O, Van der Heijden B, Ramzy O, Stoffers J, Peters P. Employable through Social Media: An Intervention Study. Sustainability. 2021; 13(9):5093. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13095093

Chicago/Turabian Style

Habets, Omar, Beatrice Van der Heijden, Omar Ramzy, Jol Stoffers, and Pascale Peters. 2021. "Employable through Social Media: An Intervention Study" Sustainability 13, no. 9: 5093. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13095093

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