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Communication

Retail Potential for Upcycled Foods: Evidence from New Zealand

1
Department of Food Science, University of Otago, Dunedin 9016, New Zealand
2
Foodstuffs NZ Ltd., Auckland 2022, New Zealand
3
School of Business Administration, Pennsylvania State University at Harrisburg, 777 West Harrisburg Pike, Middletown, PA 17057, USA
4
LeBow College of Business, Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
5
College of Nursing and Health Professions, Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Pedro Miguel Capêlo da Silva and Jorge Dinis Câmara Freitas
Sustainability 2021, 13(5), 2624; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13052624
Received: 8 February 2021 / Revised: 19 February 2021 / Accepted: 23 February 2021 / Published: 1 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Food Systems and Food Safety)
Food waste is a problem that manifests throughout the food supply chain. A promising solution that can mitigate the food waste problem across various stages of the food supply chain is upcycling food ingredients that would otherwise be wasted by converting them into new upcycled food products. This research explores perception of upcycled foods from a panel of 1001 frequent shoppers at a large grocery retailer in New Zealand. Findings from this research uncover several hitherto unexamined aspects of consumers’ evaluations of upcycled foods. These include consumers’ indications about shelf placements of upcycled foods, willingness to buy upcycled foods for people or pets other than themselves, and consumers’ preferences about information pertaining to these foods. This research advances our understanding of how consumers perceive upcycled foods and provides actionable insights to practitioners in the food industry. View Full-Text
Keywords: food waste; upcycled foods; food marketing; food retailing; sustainability food waste; upcycled foods; food marketing; food retailing; sustainability
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MDPI and ACS Style

Goodman-Smith, F.; Bhatt, S.; Moore, R.; Mirosa, M.; Ye, H.; Deutsch, J.; Suri, R. Retail Potential for Upcycled Foods: Evidence from New Zealand. Sustainability 2021, 13, 2624. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13052624

AMA Style

Goodman-Smith F, Bhatt S, Moore R, Mirosa M, Ye H, Deutsch J, Suri R. Retail Potential for Upcycled Foods: Evidence from New Zealand. Sustainability. 2021; 13(5):2624. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13052624

Chicago/Turabian Style

Goodman-Smith, Francesca, Siddharth Bhatt, Robyn Moore, Miranda Mirosa, Hongjun Ye, Jonathan Deutsch, and Rajneesh Suri. 2021. "Retail Potential for Upcycled Foods: Evidence from New Zealand" Sustainability 13, no. 5: 2624. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13052624

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