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Article

Emotional Well-Being in Urban Wilderness: Assessing States of Calmness and Alertness in Informal Green Spaces (IGSs) with Muse—Portable EEG Headband

1
Department of Landscape Art, Institute of Environmental Engineering, Warsaw University of Life Sciences (WULS-SGGW), 02-787 Warsaw, Poland
2
School of Architecture, Victoria University of Wellington, PO Box 600, Wellington 6140, New Zealand
3
Department of Management in Digital Societies, Kozminski University, Jagiellonska 57, 03-301 Warsaw, Poland
4
Department of Psychology, University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Chodakowska 19/31, 03-815 Warsaw, Poland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Boris A. Portnov
Sustainability 2021, 13(4), 2212; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13042212
Received: 17 November 2020 / Revised: 4 February 2021 / Accepted: 9 February 2021 / Published: 19 February 2021
In this experiment, we operated within the novel research area of Informal Green Spaces (often called green wastelands), exploring emotional well-being with the employment of portable electroencephalography (EEG) devices. The apparatus (commercial EEG Muse headband) provided an opportunity to analyze states of calmness and alertness in n = 20 participants as they visited selected Informal Green Spaces in Warsaw, Poland. The article aims to test the hypothesis that passive recreation in Informal Green Spaces (IGSs) has a positive impact on emotional well-being and that there is a connection between the intensity of states of calmness and alertness and 1. the type of green space (IGS/GS), 2. the type of scenery and 3. the type of IGS. The preliminary experiment showed that there might be no substantial distinction in the users’ levels of emotional states when considering existing typologies. On the other hand, data-driven analysis suggests that there might be a connection between the state of alertness and some characteristics of specific areas. After carrying out the multivariate analyses of variance in the repeated measurement scheme and finding significant differences between oscillations in different areas, we conclude that there might be three possible sources of lower alertness and increased calmness in some areas. These are 1. the presence of “desirable” human intervention such as paths and urban furniture, 2. a lack of “undesirable” users and signs of their presence and 3. the presence of other “desirable” users. View Full-Text
Keywords: Informal Green Spaces; wastelands; well-being; mood; electroencephalography (EEG); urban landscape; green infrastructure Informal Green Spaces; wastelands; well-being; mood; electroencephalography (EEG); urban landscape; green infrastructure
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MDPI and ACS Style

Herman, K.; Ciechanowski, L.; Przegalińska, A. Emotional Well-Being in Urban Wilderness: Assessing States of Calmness and Alertness in Informal Green Spaces (IGSs) with Muse—Portable EEG Headband. Sustainability 2021, 13, 2212. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13042212

AMA Style

Herman K, Ciechanowski L, Przegalińska A. Emotional Well-Being in Urban Wilderness: Assessing States of Calmness and Alertness in Informal Green Spaces (IGSs) with Muse—Portable EEG Headband. Sustainability. 2021; 13(4):2212. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13042212

Chicago/Turabian Style

Herman, Krzysztof, Leon Ciechanowski, and Aleksandra Przegalińska. 2021. "Emotional Well-Being in Urban Wilderness: Assessing States of Calmness and Alertness in Informal Green Spaces (IGSs) with Muse—Portable EEG Headband" Sustainability 13, no. 4: 2212. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13042212

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