Next Article in Journal
Implementation of a TeamWork-HBIM for the Management and Sustainability of Architectural Heritage
Next Article in Special Issue
Using Comprehensive Scenarios to Identify Social–Ecological Threats to Salmon in the Kenai River Watershed, Alaska
Previous Article in Journal
Social Sustainability in Fashion Supply Chains—Understanding Social Standard Implementation Failures in Vietnam and Indonesia Using Agency Theory
Article

Thinking Big and Thinking Small: A Conceptual Framework for Best Practices in Community and Stakeholder Engagement in Food, Energy, and Water Systems

1
Center for Resilient Communities, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844, USA
2
Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Tennessee Knoxville, Knoxville, TN 37996, USA
3
Department of Social Sciences, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI 49931, USA
4
Department of Sociology, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA
5
College of Forest Resources and Environmental Science, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI 49931, USA
6
Great Lakes Research Center, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI 49931, USA
7
Department of Agricultural Economics, Sociology, and Education, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA
8
United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Evanston, IL 60201, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Richard A. Niesenbaum
Sustainability 2021, 13(4), 2160; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13042160
Received: 7 January 2021 / Revised: 9 February 2021 / Accepted: 12 February 2021 / Published: 17 February 2021
Community and stakeholder engagement is increasingly recognized as essential to science at the nexus of food, energy, and water systems (FEWS) to address complex issues surrounding food and energy production and water provision for society. Yet no comprehensive framework exists for supporting best practices in community and stakeholder engagement for FEWS. A review and meta-synthesis were undertaken of a broad range of existing models, frameworks, and toolkits for community and stakeholder engagement. A framework is proposed that comprises situational awareness of the FEWS place or problem, creation of a suitable culture for engagement, focus on power-sharing in the engagement process, co-ownership, co-generation of knowledge and outcomes, the technical process of integration, the monitoring processes of reflective and reflexive experiences, and formative evaluation. The framework is discussed as a scaffolding for supporting the development and application of best practices in community and stakeholder engagement in ways that are arguably essential for sound FEWS science and sustainable management. View Full-Text
Keywords: best practices; community engagement; conceptual framework; co-production; food-energy-water systems; stakeholder engagement; transdisciplinary best practices; community engagement; conceptual framework; co-production; food-energy-water systems; stakeholder engagement; transdisciplinary
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Kliskey, A.; Williams, P.; Griffith, D.L.; Dale, V.H.; Schelly, C.; Marshall, A.-M.; Gagnon, V.S.; Eaton, W.M.; Floress, K. Thinking Big and Thinking Small: A Conceptual Framework for Best Practices in Community and Stakeholder Engagement in Food, Energy, and Water Systems. Sustainability 2021, 13, 2160. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13042160

AMA Style

Kliskey A, Williams P, Griffith DL, Dale VH, Schelly C, Marshall A-M, Gagnon VS, Eaton WM, Floress K. Thinking Big and Thinking Small: A Conceptual Framework for Best Practices in Community and Stakeholder Engagement in Food, Energy, and Water Systems. Sustainability. 2021; 13(4):2160. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13042160

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kliskey, Andrew, Paula Williams, David L. Griffith, Virginia H. Dale, Chelsea Schelly, Anna-Maria Marshall, Valoree S. Gagnon, Weston M. Eaton, and Kristin Floress. 2021. "Thinking Big and Thinking Small: A Conceptual Framework for Best Practices in Community and Stakeholder Engagement in Food, Energy, and Water Systems" Sustainability 13, no. 4: 2160. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13042160

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop