Next Article in Journal
Towards Circular Social Housing: An Exploration of Practices, Barriers, and Enablers
Next Article in Special Issue
Global Analysis of Durable Policies for Free-Flowing River Protections
Previous Article in Journal
Facilitating Sustainable Outcomes for the Organization of Youth Sports through Youth Engagement
Previous Article in Special Issue
Durable Freshwater Protection: A Framework for Establishing and Maintaining Long-Term Protection for Freshwater Ecosystems and the Values They Sustain
Article

Using Partnerships and Community Science to Protect Wild and Scenic Rivers in the Eastern United States

1
OARS: For the Assabet, Sudbury and Concord Rivers, Concord, MA 01742, USA
2
Musconetcong Watershed Association, Asbury, NJ 08802, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Denielle M. Perry
Sustainability 2021, 13(4), 2102; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13042102
Received: 30 November 2020 / Revised: 3 February 2021 / Accepted: 4 February 2021 / Published: 16 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Durable Protections for Free-Flowing Rivers)
The Musconetcong (New Jersey) and the Sudbury-Assabet-Concord (Massachusetts) are federally-designated Partnership Wild and Scenic Rivers, a model for river conservation under the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act. These two rivers are embedded in a patchwork of private and public land ownership. The Act has been used to facilitate partnerships among municipal, state, federal and local non-profit actors to implement river conservation plans. These partnerships have supported community science-based monitoring to make the case for dam removal and stricter water pollution controls. Two case studies examine using community science to provide actionable data to decision-makers. In New Jersey, a documented increase in macroinvertebrates post-dam removal supported additional dam removals, leading to the return of American shad to the river. Quality controls and training proved to be key components. In Massachusetts, stricter effluent discharge permits reduced instream Total Phosphorus from 0.8 mg/L in 1999 to the eutrophication threshold of 0.023–0.05 mg/L. Community engagement in river science and stewardship was an important co-benefit. As many US rivers evolve from generating hydropower and conveying waste into major recreational resources, local organizations are uniquely positioned to engage the public and generate quality-controlled data to use in advocating for major improvements in water and habitat quality. Useful policy and regulatory frameworks for broader applicability are suggested. View Full-Text
Keywords: citizen science; Wild and Scenic Rivers Act; community science; dam removal; NPDES; water quality monitoring; Clean Water Act citizen science; Wild and Scenic Rivers Act; community science; dam removal; NPDES; water quality monitoring; Clean Water Act
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Field-Juma, A.; Roberts-Lawler, N. Using Partnerships and Community Science to Protect Wild and Scenic Rivers in the Eastern United States. Sustainability 2021, 13, 2102. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13042102

AMA Style

Field-Juma A, Roberts-Lawler N. Using Partnerships and Community Science to Protect Wild and Scenic Rivers in the Eastern United States. Sustainability. 2021; 13(4):2102. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13042102

Chicago/Turabian Style

Field-Juma, Alison, and Nancy Roberts-Lawler. 2021. "Using Partnerships and Community Science to Protect Wild and Scenic Rivers in the Eastern United States" Sustainability 13, no. 4: 2102. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13042102

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop