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Article

Food Losses and Wastage along the Wheat Value Chain in Egypt and Their Implications on Food and Energy Security, Natural Resources, and the Environment

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International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA), Cairo 11711, Egypt
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Agricultural Research Center (ARC) of Egypt, Cairo 12619, Egypt
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International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA), Dubai 13979, United Arab Emirates
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International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA), Tunis 1302, Tunisia
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Felicitas Schneider, Stefan Lange and Thomas Schmidt
Sustainability 2021, 13(18), 10011; https://doi.org/10.3390/su131810011
Received: 11 July 2021 / Revised: 23 August 2021 / Accepted: 24 August 2021 / Published: 7 September 2021
Pushing yield frontiers of cereals and legumes is becoming increasingly difficult, especially in drylands. This paper argues and provides empirical evidence that food loss and wastage constitute a sizeable proportion of the total wheat supply in Egypt. By following the life cycle of food and using standard measurement protocols, we estimated the levels of food loss and wastage along the wheat value chain in Egypt and their socioeconomic, biophysical, and environmental implications. About 4.4 million tons (20.62% of total wheat supply from domestic production and imports in 2017/2018) is estimated to be lost or wasted in Egypt which is also associated with the wastage of about 4.79 billion m3 of water, and 74.72 million GJ of energy. This implies that if Egypt manages to eliminate, or considerably reduce, wheat-related losses and wastage, it will save enough food to feed 21 million more people from domestic production and hence reduce wheat imports by 37%, save 1.1 billion USD of much-needed foreign exchange, and reduce emissions of at least 260.84 million kg carbon dioxide-equivalent and 8.5 million kg of methane. Therefore, investment in reducing food loss and wastage can be an effective strategy to complement ongoing efforts to enhance food security through productivity enhancement in Egypt. View Full-Text
Keywords: wheat; value chain; food loss; food waste; food and energy security; natural resources and environment wheat; value chain; food loss; food waste; food and energy security; natural resources and environment
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MDPI and ACS Style

Yigezu, Y.A.; Moustafa, M.A.; Mohiy, M.M.; Ibrahim, S.E.; Ghanem, W.M.; Niane, A.-A.; Abbas, E.; Sabry, S.R.S.; Halila, H. Food Losses and Wastage along the Wheat Value Chain in Egypt and Their Implications on Food and Energy Security, Natural Resources, and the Environment. Sustainability 2021, 13, 10011. https://doi.org/10.3390/su131810011

AMA Style

Yigezu YA, Moustafa MA, Mohiy MM, Ibrahim SE, Ghanem WM, Niane A-A, Abbas E, Sabry SRS, Halila H. Food Losses and Wastage along the Wheat Value Chain in Egypt and Their Implications on Food and Energy Security, Natural Resources, and the Environment. Sustainability. 2021; 13(18):10011. https://doi.org/10.3390/su131810011

Chicago/Turabian Style

Yigezu, Yigezu A., Moustafa A. Moustafa, Mohamed M. Mohiy, Shaimaa E. Ibrahim, Wael M. Ghanem, Abdoul-Aziz Niane, Enas Abbas, Sami R.S. Sabry, and Habib Halila. 2021. "Food Losses and Wastage along the Wheat Value Chain in Egypt and Their Implications on Food and Energy Security, Natural Resources, and the Environment" Sustainability 13, no. 18: 10011. https://doi.org/10.3390/su131810011

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