Next Article in Journal
Foliar Urea with N-(n-butyl) Thiophosphoric Triamide for Sustainable Yield and Quality of Pineapple in a Controlled Environment
Previous Article in Journal
Low-Powered Photodetector Based on Two-Dimensional InS0.3Se0.7/WS2 Heterostructure
 
 
Article

Decentralization for Increased Sustainability in Natural Resource Management? Two Cautionary Cases from Ghana

1
Institute of Geography, University of Bern, 3012 Bern, Switzerland
2
Center for Regional Economic Development, University of Bern, 3012 Bern, Switzerland
3
Institute of Social Anthropology, University of Bern, 3012 Bern, Switzerland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Alan Randall
Sustainability 2021, 13(12), 6885; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13126885
Received: 29 May 2021 / Revised: 8 June 2021 / Accepted: 15 June 2021 / Published: 18 June 2021
In Sub-Saharan African countries, governments are increasingly devolving natural resource management from central administration to the local government level as a trend toward subsidiarity. In parallel, efforts to implement formalization processes have resulted in a puzzling institutional arena, wherein mixed actors are struggling to influence the paths of institutional change and the associated distribution of land and land-related resources. Relying on political ecology and new institutionalism in social anthropology, we investigate how the decentralization of formalization of rights in artisanal and small-scale gold mining can lead to paradoxical outcomes, often negatively impacting social, economic, and environmental sustainability. Two comparative case studies are performed in Ghana. Our results show that the negative effects of formalization efforts for resource end users are to be understood in the broad context of actors’ repositioning strategies following the selective implementation of decentralization. The authors conclude that increasing the power of the central government and line ministries to control local resources can influence the disenfranchisement of local people’s participation and control of natural resources, resulting in a relentless environmental crisis. View Full-Text
Keywords: artisanal mining; conflict; decentralization; formalization; sustainability artisanal mining; conflict; decentralization; formalization; sustainability
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Adam, J.N.; Adams, T.; Gerber, J.-D.; Haller, T. Decentralization for Increased Sustainability in Natural Resource Management? Two Cautionary Cases from Ghana. Sustainability 2021, 13, 6885. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13126885

AMA Style

Adam JN, Adams T, Gerber J-D, Haller T. Decentralization for Increased Sustainability in Natural Resource Management? Two Cautionary Cases from Ghana. Sustainability. 2021; 13(12):6885. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13126885

Chicago/Turabian Style

Adam, James Natia, Timothy Adams, Jean-David Gerber, and Tobias Haller. 2021. "Decentralization for Increased Sustainability in Natural Resource Management? Two Cautionary Cases from Ghana" Sustainability 13, no. 12: 6885. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13126885

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop