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Article

What Do People Say When They Become “Future People”?―Positioning Imaginary Future Generations (IFGs) in General Rules for Good Decision-Making

1
Policy Research Institute, Ministry of Finance, Tokyo 100-8440, Japan
2
Research Center for Diversity and Inclusion, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima 739-8524, Japan
3
Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871, Japan
4
Research Institute for Future Design, Kochi University of Technology, Kochi 782-8517, Japan
5
Research Institute of Humanity and Nature, Kyoto 603-8047, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Ans Vercammen
Sustainability 2021, 13(12), 6631; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13126631
Received: 6 April 2021 / Revised: 24 May 2021 / Accepted: 7 June 2021 / Published: 10 June 2021
(This article belongs to the Collection Future Design)
In public decisions with long-term implications, decisions of the present generation will affect long-term welfare, including future generations. However, only the present generation is able to participate in such decision-making processes. In this study, we invited “Imaginary Future Generations” (IFGs), as participants in a discussion who take on the role of members of future generations to argue on behalf of their future interests to engage in present-day deliberations among residents of a Japanese town. Through analysis, it was seen that the deliberations among IFGs rose interest in issues that are related to common fundamental needs across generations. While the cognitive aspects of interpersonal reactivity, which measure the reactions of one individual to the observed experiences of another, were seen as useful in arguing for the interests of future generations, it was suggested that the environment for deliberation had a significant impact on the ability to effectively take on the role of members of future generations. Finally, this paper positioned IFGs within the broad context of general rules for good decision-making, based on an analysis of these deliberations and in light of philosophical arguments such as the veil of ignorance by John Rawls. View Full-Text
Keywords: Future Design; Imaginary Future Generations; deliberations; general rules for good decision-making Future Design; Imaginary Future Generations; deliberations; general rules for good decision-making
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MDPI and ACS Style

Hiromitsu, T.; Kitakaji, Y.; Hara, K.; Saijo, T. What Do People Say When They Become “Future People”?―Positioning Imaginary Future Generations (IFGs) in General Rules for Good Decision-Making. Sustainability 2021, 13, 6631. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13126631

AMA Style

Hiromitsu T, Kitakaji Y, Hara K, Saijo T. What Do People Say When They Become “Future People”?―Positioning Imaginary Future Generations (IFGs) in General Rules for Good Decision-Making. Sustainability. 2021; 13(12):6631. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13126631

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hiromitsu, Toshiaki, Yoko Kitakaji, Keishiro Hara, and Tatsuyoshi Saijo. 2021. "What Do People Say When They Become “Future People”?―Positioning Imaginary Future Generations (IFGs) in General Rules for Good Decision-Making" Sustainability 13, no. 12: 6631. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13126631

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