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Open AccessArticle

A Partially Non-Compensatory Method to Measure the Smart and Sustainable Level of Italian Municipalities

1
Department of Economics—DIEC, University of Genoa, 16126 Genoa, Italy
2
Centro de Investigaciones en Econometría—CIE, University of Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires C1113 CABA, Argentina
3
Department of Political Science—DISPO, University of Genoa, 16125 Genoa, Italy
4
C.I.E.L.I., the Italian Center of Excellence on Logistics Transports and Infrastructures, University of Genoa, 16126 Genoa, Italy
5
Department of Physical Geography and Regional Geographical Analysis, University of Seville, 41004 Sevilla, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2021, 13(1), 435; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13010435
Received: 11 November 2020 / Revised: 25 December 2020 / Accepted: 30 December 2020 / Published: 5 January 2021
A smart sustainable city (SSC) is a paradigm that encapsulates the latest lines of development in multiple fields of research. The attempt to converge towards a model of sustainable urban life, made difficult by increasing anthropic pressure and polluting activities conducted by man, is also reflected in the intentions of public institutions to take measures of environmental risk mitigation. The change towards more liveable cities must also include the adoption of more far-reaching measures in various sectors. The objective of our work was to provide an analysis in order to assess which of the Italian provincial municipalities were most closely related to the paradigm of SSCs. This aim was pursued through a comparison based on the results of a partially non-compensatory quantitative method, known as the Pena’s Distance method (DP2). The smartest and most sustainable cities, such as Siena, Milan and Padua, were not identified on the basis of common urban characteristics but rather derived from the combination of distinctive and functional elements in the pursuit of a strategic approach aimed at fully exploiting the resources of each area. Moreover, at a macro-geographical level, from the analysis emerged the presence of contiguous clusters, i.e., areas in which a major concentration of smart sustainable municipalities tended to form. View Full-Text
Keywords: smart sustainable city; Italy; monitoring; DP2 index; non-compensatory index smart sustainable city; Italy; monitoring; DP2 index; non-compensatory index
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ciacci, A.; Ivaldi, E.; González-Relaño, R. A Partially Non-Compensatory Method to Measure the Smart and Sustainable Level of Italian Municipalities. Sustainability 2021, 13, 435. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13010435

AMA Style

Ciacci A, Ivaldi E, González-Relaño R. A Partially Non-Compensatory Method to Measure the Smart and Sustainable Level of Italian Municipalities. Sustainability. 2021; 13(1):435. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13010435

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ciacci, Andrea; Ivaldi, Enrico; González-Relaño, Reyes. 2021. "A Partially Non-Compensatory Method to Measure the Smart and Sustainable Level of Italian Municipalities" Sustainability 13, no. 1: 435. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13010435

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