Next Article in Journal
Quantitative Models of Well-Being to Inform Policy: Problems and Opportunities
Previous Article in Journal
Constructing the Public in Roadmapping the Transition to a Bioeconomy: A Case Study from the Netherlands
Article

Xanthomonas Wilt of Banana Drives Changes in Land-Use and Ecosystem Services Across Infected Landscapes

1
The Alliance of Bioversity International and CIAT, P.O. Box 24384, Kampala, Uganda
2
Farming Systems Ecology, Wageningen University, P.O. Box 563, 6700 AN Wageningen, The Netherlands
3
Agroecology, Environment and Systems Group, Instituto de Investigaciones Forestales y Agropecuarias de Bariloche (IFAB), San Carlos de Bariloche 8400, Río Negro, Argentina
4
Groningen Institute of Evolutionary Life Sciences, Groningen University, Nijenborgh 7, 9747 AG Groningen, The Netherlands
5
International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), P.O. Box 7878, Kampala, Uganda
6
The Alliance of Bioversity International and CIAT, P.O. Box 1860, Bukavu, South Kivu, Democratic Republic of Congo
7
INERA, Mulungu, Research Station, Bukavu, South Kivu, P.O. Box 2037, Kinshasa 1, Democratic Republic of Congo
8
IITA, Kalambo, P.O. Box 1222, Bukavu, South Kivu, Democratic Republic of Congo
9
The Alliance of Bioversity International and CIAT, P.O. Box 5689, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2020, 12(8), 3178; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12083178
Received: 18 November 2019 / Revised: 18 January 2020 / Accepted: 23 January 2020 / Published: 15 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Sustainable Agriculture)
Changes in land-use have been observed in banana-based systems in the African Great Lakes region affected by Xanthomonas wilt disease (XW) of banana. Through focus group discussions (FGDs) and the 4-cell method (to map the area under production and the number of households involved), changes in land-use were assessed in 13 XW-affected landscapes/villages along a 230 km transect from Masisi (where XW arrived in 2001) to Bukavu (XW arrived around 2014) in the Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo. Farmers’ perceptions on the sustainability of new land uses were also documented. Soil nutrient content and erosion levels were measured for five major land-use options/trajectories on 147 fields across 55 farms in three landscapes along the transect. From banana being ranked the most important crop (92% of landscapes) before XW outbreaks, its importance had declined, with it grown on smaller farms by most households in 36% of the landscapes, while in 64% of cases by few households on smaller plots. Farmers uprooted entire banana mats or fields, expanding land under other crops. Species richness did not change at landscape level, although 21 crops were introduced at farm level. Banana is, however, still perceived as more sustainable due to its multi-functional roles. Soils under banana had better chemical attributes, while high erosion levels (Mg ha−1 year−1) occurred under cassava (1.7–148.9) compared with banana (0.3–10.7) and trees (0.3–5.9). The shifts from banana could thus affect supply of key services and sustainability of the farming systems. This study offers a good basis for interventions in XW-affected landscapes. View Full-Text
Keywords: communities; disease; multi-functional; perceptions; soil erosion; uprooting communities; disease; multi-functional; perceptions; soil erosion; uprooting
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Ocimati, W.; Groot, J.J.C.; Tittonell, P.; Taulya, G.; Ntamwira, J.; Amato, S.; Blomme, G. Xanthomonas Wilt of Banana Drives Changes in Land-Use and Ecosystem Services Across Infected Landscapes. Sustainability 2020, 12, 3178. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12083178

AMA Style

Ocimati W, Groot JJC, Tittonell P, Taulya G, Ntamwira J, Amato S, Blomme G. Xanthomonas Wilt of Banana Drives Changes in Land-Use and Ecosystem Services Across Infected Landscapes. Sustainability. 2020; 12(8):3178. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12083178

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ocimati, Walter, Jeroen J.C. Groot, Pablo Tittonell, Godfrey Taulya, Jules Ntamwira, Serge Amato, and Guy Blomme. 2020. "Xanthomonas Wilt of Banana Drives Changes in Land-Use and Ecosystem Services Across Infected Landscapes" Sustainability 12, no. 8: 3178. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12083178

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop