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Open AccessArticle

Linking Work-Family Conflict (WFC) and Talent Management: Insights from a Developing Country

1
Department of Applied Psychology, Lahore College for Women University, Lahore 54000, Pakistan
2
Department of Applied Psychology, The Islamia University of Bahawalpur, Bahawalpur 54500, Pakistan
3
Effat College of Business, Effat University, Jeddah P.O. Box 34689, Saudi Arabia
4
Department of Operations, Technology, Events and Hospitality Management, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester M15 6BH, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2020, 12(7), 2861; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12072861
Received: 12 March 2020 / Revised: 1 April 2020 / Accepted: 1 April 2020 / Published: 3 April 2020
Considering the profound societal change taking place in several developing countries, the objective of this paper is to reflect on work-family conflict (WFC) both as a concept and a social phenomenon. Given that WFC is a concept rooted in academic debate focusing on developments in Western, largely individualistic, societies, this paper reconsiders WFC’s value added as applied in a context of a collectivist society in a developing country. The objective of this paper is thus threefold, i.e., (i) to assess WFC’s applicability in a context of a collectivist society in a developing country, where the position and role of women gradually changes; (ii) to develop a culturally adjusted/sensitive scale to measure the scope of WFC in Pakistan, whereby the latter is treated here as a case study; and (iii) to reflect on the possibility of devising a set of good practices that would allow a smooth inclusion of women in the formal workforce, while at the same time mitigating the scope and scale of WFC. The value added of this paper stems from these three objectives. View Full-Text
Keywords: work family conflict; talent management; sustainability; best practice; developing country; modernization; women in society; women in formal workforce; collectivist societies; Pakistan work family conflict; talent management; sustainability; best practice; developing country; modernization; women in society; women in formal workforce; collectivist societies; Pakistan
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ahmad, M.; Muazzam, A.; Anjum, A.; Visvizi, A.; Nawaz, R. Linking Work-Family Conflict (WFC) and Talent Management: Insights from a Developing Country. Sustainability 2020, 12, 2861. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12072861

AMA Style

Ahmad M, Muazzam A, Anjum A, Visvizi A, Nawaz R. Linking Work-Family Conflict (WFC) and Talent Management: Insights from a Developing Country. Sustainability. 2020; 12(7):2861. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12072861

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ahmad, Mahira; Muazzam, Amina; Anjum, Ambreen; Visvizi, Anna; Nawaz, Raheel. 2020. "Linking Work-Family Conflict (WFC) and Talent Management: Insights from a Developing Country" Sustainability 12, no. 7: 2861. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12072861

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