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Perspectives on Citizen Engagement for the EU Post-2020 Biodiversity Strategy: An Empirical Study
Open AccessArticle

MICESE: A New Method Used for the Formulation of Key Messages from the Scientific Community for the EU Post 2020 Biodiversity Strategy

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INRAE, UR EFNO, Domaine des Barres, F-45290 Nogent-sur-Vernisson, France
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School of Biology, Department of Zoology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-54124 Thessaloniki, Greece
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Department of Conservation Biology, UFZ–Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, UFZ Science-Policy Expert Group, Permoserstrasse 15, 04318 Leipzig, Germany
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Norwegian Institute for Nature Research (NINA), P. O. Box 5685 Torgard, No-7485 Trondheim, Norway
5
Finnish Environment Institute, SYKE, Latokartanonkaari 11, 00790 Helsinki, Finland
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Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences, Museum of Natural Sciences, Vautier Street 29, 1000 Brussels, Belgium
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UK Centre for Ecology and Hydrology Edinburgh, Bush Estate, Penicuik EH26 0QB, UK
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Agroécologie, AgroSup Dijon, INRAE, Univ. Bourgogne, Univ. Bourgogne Franche-Comté, F-21000 Dijon, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2020, 12(6), 2385; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12062385
Received: 30 January 2020 / Revised: 11 March 2020 / Accepted: 13 March 2020 / Published: 18 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service: Challenges for the Future)
The European Union (EU) 2020 Biodiversity strategy will soon come to an end and may not have been as successful as envisioned. In the current context of the global biodiversity crisis, the European Commission, the research community, and broader society cannot risk another, likely ineffective, attempt by the EU to halt biodiversity loss after 2020. Through the development of the EU post 2020 Biodiversity Strategy, the scientific community of the ALTER-Net and EKLIPSE networks saw a unique opportunity to make a difference for biodiversity in Europe by better involving scientists, policy makers, and society. We developed an innovative, transparent, and collaborative process—called the multiphased, iterative, and consultative elicitation of scientific expertise (MICESE) method. This process allowed us to produce a set of 12 key messages developed by scientists for the EU to prioritize in the development of the new post 2020 biodiversity strategy. These key messages were structured according to their systemic value, scale, and nature. We provide insights and analyses of the new MICESE method before reflecting on how to improve the future involvement of scientists in science–policy interfaces. View Full-Text
Keywords: science–policy interface; European Union; consultation process; methodology; elicitation of scientific expertise; iterative science–policy interface; European Union; consultation process; methodology; elicitation of scientific expertise; iterative
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Gosselin, F.; Galanaki, A.; Vandewalle, M.; Van Dijk, J.; Varumo, L.; Ventocilla, J.; Watt, A.; Young, J. MICESE: A New Method Used for the Formulation of Key Messages from the Scientific Community for the EU Post 2020 Biodiversity Strategy. Sustainability 2020, 12, 2385.

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