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Article

Sustainable Development in Sparsely Populated Territories: Case of the Russian Arctic and Far East

1
Aleksanteri Institute, University of Helsinki, FI-00014 Helsinki, Finland
2
Institute of Engineering & Technology, North-Eastern Federal University, 677000 Yakutsk, Russia
3
Federal Research Centre ‘Yakutsk Scientific Center’, Siberian Branch, RAS, 677000 Yakutsk, Russia
4
Faculty of Arts, University of Helsinki, FI-00014 Helsinki, Finland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2020, 12(6), 2367; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12062367
Received: 3 February 2020 / Revised: 11 March 2020 / Accepted: 12 March 2020 / Published: 18 March 2020
Extreme environmental conditions, sparsely distributed human populations, and diverse local economies characterize the Russian Arctic and Far East. There is an urgent need for multidisciplinary research into how the Arctic and Far East can be developed sustainably as global changes in the environment and the economic priorities of nations accelerate and globalized societies emerge. Yet, when it comes to sustainability indicators, little consideration has been given thus far to sparsely populated and remote territories. Rather, the majority of indicators have been developed and tested while using empirical research gathered from cities and densely populated rural localities. As a result, there is no scientific technique that can be used to monitor the development of sparsely populated territories and inform the decisions of policymakers who hope to account for local specificity. This article suggests a conceptual model for linking sustainability to the unique characteristics of the sparsely populated regions of the Arctic and Far East. We provide an empirical illustration that is based on regional-level data from the sparsely populated territories of the Russian Federation. We conclude by suggesting indicators that could be best suited to promoting balanced regional development that accounts for the environment, economy, and social needs of sparsely populated territories. View Full-Text
Keywords: sustainability; Arctic; Far East; sparsely populated territories; natural capital; adjusted net savings index; ecosystem approach; indicators; monitoring sustainability; Arctic; Far East; sparsely populated territories; natural capital; adjusted net savings index; ecosystem approach; indicators; monitoring
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MDPI and ACS Style

Stepanova, N.; Gritsenko, D.; Gavrilyeva, T.; Belokur, A. Sustainable Development in Sparsely Populated Territories: Case of the Russian Arctic and Far East. Sustainability 2020, 12, 2367. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12062367

AMA Style

Stepanova N, Gritsenko D, Gavrilyeva T, Belokur A. Sustainable Development in Sparsely Populated Territories: Case of the Russian Arctic and Far East. Sustainability. 2020; 12(6):2367. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12062367

Chicago/Turabian Style

Stepanova, Nadezhda, Daria Gritsenko, Tuyara Gavrilyeva, and Anna Belokur. 2020. "Sustainable Development in Sparsely Populated Territories: Case of the Russian Arctic and Far East" Sustainability 12, no. 6: 2367. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12062367

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