Next Article in Journal
The Life Cycle of Corporate Social Responsibility in Agri-Food: Value Creation Models
Next Article in Special Issue
Multi-Objective Optimal Allocation of Urban Water Resources While Considering Conflict Resolution Based on the PSO Algorithm: A Case Study of Kunming, China
Previous Article in Journal
Innovative Multidisciplinary Methodology for the Analysis of Traditional Marginal Architecture
Previous Article in Special Issue
Prediction of Technological Change under Shared Socioeconomic Pathways and Regional Differences: A Case Study of Irrigation Water Use Efficiency Changes in Chinese Provinces
Open AccessArticle

Strategic Insights into the Cauvery River Dispute in India

1
Department of Systems Design Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Canada
2
Department of Knowledge Integration, Faculty of Environment, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2020, 12(4), 1286; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12041286
Received: 14 August 2019 / Revised: 24 January 2020 / Accepted: 29 January 2020 / Published: 11 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Resources and Green Growth)
For hundreds of years, conflicts in water sharing have existed all around the globe. Cauvery River, in the southern part of India, has been in the midst of such conflict for the last 130 years. Historically, the conflict has been about the right to use water and the states/provinces in conflict have used the water from the river for agricultural purposes. Due to industrialization in the late 1980s and increasing population, water availability in the region has become stressed. Climate change has exacerbated the region’s water availability issues. Faltering rainfall has caused unrest in the region, and the traditional methods of water sharing are dwindling under political pressure. Without a climate change strategy, the governments of these states will never be able to solve this complex issue at hand. The Graph Model for Conflict Resolution (GMCR) is applied to understand the nuances of this conflict. It models the preferences of the decision-makers (the states of Tamil Nadu and Karnataka) and the common option (goal) they can reach to potentially solve the conflict. Fuzzy preferences along with option prioritization is also applied to this conflict in order to account for the uncertainties in the decision-makers’ preferences. The purpose of this paper is to nudge decision-makers in a productive direction to overcome the long-impending political standoff, while introducing a new methodology of looking into this old conflict. View Full-Text
Keywords: Conflict Resolution; Graph Model; fuzzy preference; option prioritization; Water Resources; GMCR Conflict Resolution; Graph Model; fuzzy preference; option prioritization; Water Resources; GMCR
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Sharma, A.; Hipel, K.W.; Schweizer, V. Strategic Insights into the Cauvery River Dispute in India. Sustainability 2020, 12, 1286.

AMA Style

Sharma A, Hipel KW, Schweizer V. Strategic Insights into the Cauvery River Dispute in India. Sustainability. 2020; 12(4):1286.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sharma, Ajar; Hipel, Keith W.; Schweizer, Vanessa. 2020. "Strategic Insights into the Cauvery River Dispute in India" Sustainability 12, no. 4: 1286.

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop