Next Article in Journal
Competition and Game of the Pre-Installed Market and Post-Installed Market of the Internet of Vehicles from the Perspective of Cooperation
Previous Article in Journal
Removal of Calcium Carbonate Water-Based Filter Cake Using a Green Biodegradable Acid
Open AccessArticle

Indigenous Knowledge and Seasonal Calendar Inform Adaptive Savanna Burning in Northern Australia

1
Ecosystem Management, School of Environmental and Rural Science, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2351, Australia
2
Department of Environmental Sciences, Macquarie University, 12 Wally’s Walk, Sydney, NSW 2109, Australia
3
Caring for Country Branch, Northern Land Council, GPO Box 1222, Darwin, NT 0801, Australia
4
Firesticks Alliance Indigenous Corporation, Rosebank, NSW 2480, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2020, 12(3), 995; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12030995
Received: 20 December 2019 / Revised: 21 January 2020 / Accepted: 25 January 2020 / Published: 30 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Environmental Sustainability and Applications)
Indigenous fire management is experiencing a resurgence worldwide. Northern Australia is the world leader in Indigenous savanna burning, delivering social, cultural, environmental and economic benefits. In 2016, a greenhouse gas abatement fire program commenced in the savannas of south-eastern Arnhem Land in the Northern Territory, managed by the Indigenous Yugul Mangi rangers. We undertook participatory action research and semi-structured interviews with rangers and Elders during 2016 and 2019 to investigate Indigenous knowledge and obtain local feedback about fire management. Results indicated that Indigenous rangers effectively use cross-cultural science (including local and Traditional Ecological Knowledge alongside western science) to manage fire. Fire management is a key driver in the production of bush tucker (wild food) resources and impacts other cultural and ecological values. A need for increased education and awareness about Indigenous burning was consistently emphasized. To address this, the project participants developed the Yugul Mangi Faiya En Sisen Kelenda (Yugul Mangi Fire and Seasons Calendar) that drew on Indigenous knowledge of seasonal biocultural indicators to guide the rangers’ fire management planning. The calendar has potential for application in fire management planning, intergenerational transfer of Indigenous knowledge and locally driven adaptive fire management. View Full-Text
Keywords: ecological calendar; Traditional Ecological Knowledge; cross-cultural; fire management; Indigenous fire; fire ecology; wildfire; wildland fire; Indigenous ecological calendar; Traditional Ecological Knowledge; cross-cultural; fire management; Indigenous fire; fire ecology; wildfire; wildland fire; Indigenous
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

McKemey, M.; Ens, E.; Rangers, Y.M.; Costello, O.; Reid, N. Indigenous Knowledge and Seasonal Calendar Inform Adaptive Savanna Burning in Northern Australia. Sustainability 2020, 12, 995.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop