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Article

Fast Fashion Avoidance Beliefs and Anti-Consumption Behaviors: The Cases of Korea and Spain

1
Department of Home Economics Education, Korea University, Seoul 02841, Korea
2
Department of Textiles, Merchandising, and Fashion Design, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826, Korea
3
Research Institute of Human Ecology, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2020, 12(17), 6907; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12176907
Received: 29 June 2020 / Revised: 6 August 2020 / Accepted: 22 August 2020 / Published: 25 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Clothing Consumption: Circular Use of Apparel)
The ethics of the fast fashion industry have been called into question with the emergence of new consumption paradigms, such as anti-consumerism and sustainable consumption. This study aims to explore the conceptual structure of fast fashion avoidance beliefs that have led to the anti-consumption of fast fashion. Data were collected from female consumers aged between 20 and 39 years with experiences of purchasing fast fashion brands in Korea and Spain. The structure of avoidance beliefs was compared through second-order factor analysis, and the data were analyzed using multiple regression. The structure of avoidance beliefs showed satisfactory validity and reliability in Korea, whereas deindividuation and foreignness were not included as negative beliefs in Spain. An analysis of the association between negative beliefs and anti-consumption showed that deindividuation and foreignness had positive effects on the anti-consumption of fast fashion in Korea. In Spain, poor performance and irresponsibility had positive effects, while overly trendy style had a negative effect on the anti-consumption of fast fashion. These findings contribute to the literature on anti-fast fashion consumption as part of the ethical apparel consumption movements. We can understand global consumers’ anti-consumption of fast fashion, diagnose the current status of fast fashion in the global market, and even suggest future directions for fast fashion retailers. View Full-Text
Keywords: fast fashion; fast fashion avoidance; avoidance belief; anti-consumption of fast fashion; Korea; Spain fast fashion; fast fashion avoidance; avoidance belief; anti-consumption of fast fashion; Korea; Spain
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MDPI and ACS Style

Yoon, N.; Lee, H.K.; Choo, H.J. Fast Fashion Avoidance Beliefs and Anti-Consumption Behaviors: The Cases of Korea and Spain. Sustainability 2020, 12, 6907. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12176907

AMA Style

Yoon N, Lee HK, Choo HJ. Fast Fashion Avoidance Beliefs and Anti-Consumption Behaviors: The Cases of Korea and Spain. Sustainability. 2020; 12(17):6907. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12176907

Chicago/Turabian Style

Yoon, Namhee, Ha K. Lee, and Ho J. Choo 2020. "Fast Fashion Avoidance Beliefs and Anti-Consumption Behaviors: The Cases of Korea and Spain" Sustainability 12, no. 17: 6907. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12176907

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