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COVID-19, the Climate, and Transformative Change: Comparing the Social Anatomies of Crises and Their Regulatory Responses

1
School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences, Örebro University, SE-702 81 Örebro, Sweden
2
School of Business Society and Engineering, Mälardalen University, SE-722 20 Västerås, Sweden
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2020, 12(16), 6337; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12166337
Received: 6 July 2020 / Revised: 31 July 2020 / Accepted: 4 August 2020 / Published: 6 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Air, Climate Change and Sustainability)
Despite forces struggling to reduce global warming growing stronger, there has been mixed success in generating substantive policy implementation, while the global spread of the coronavirus has prompted strong and far-reaching governmental responses around the world. This paper addresses the complex and partly contradictory responses to these two crises, investigating their social anatomies. Using temporality, spatiality, and epistemic authority as the main conceptual vehicles, the two crises are systematically compared. Despite sharing a number of similarities, the most striking difference between the two crises is the urgency of action to counter the rapid spread of the pandemic as compared to the slow and meager action to mitigate longstanding, well-documented, and accelerating climate change. Although the tide now seems to have turned towards a quick and massive effort to restore the status quo—including attempts to restart the existing economic growth models, which imply an obvious risk for substantially increasing CO2 emissions—the article finally points at some signs of an opening window of opportunity for green growth and degrowth initiatives. However, these signs have to be realistically interpreted in relation to the broader context of power relations in terms of governance configurations and regulatory strategies worldwide at different levels of society. View Full-Text
Keywords: climate change; corona; COVID-19; crisis; governance; pandemic; regulatory regime; risk; securitization; transformative change climate change; corona; COVID-19; crisis; governance; pandemic; regulatory regime; risk; securitization; transformative change
MDPI and ACS Style

Lidskog, R.; Elander, I.; Standring, A. COVID-19, the Climate, and Transformative Change: Comparing the Social Anatomies of Crises and Their Regulatory Responses. Sustainability 2020, 12, 6337. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12166337

AMA Style

Lidskog R, Elander I, Standring A. COVID-19, the Climate, and Transformative Change: Comparing the Social Anatomies of Crises and Their Regulatory Responses. Sustainability. 2020; 12(16):6337. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12166337

Chicago/Turabian Style

Lidskog, Rolf, Ingemar Elander, and Adam Standring. 2020. "COVID-19, the Climate, and Transformative Change: Comparing the Social Anatomies of Crises and Their Regulatory Responses" Sustainability 12, no. 16: 6337. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12166337

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