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Characterisation, Recovery and Recycling Potential of Solid Waste in a University of a Developing Economy

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Department of Ecology and Resources Management, University of Venda, Thohoyandou 0950, South Africa
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Department of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Venda, Thohoyandou 0950, South Africa
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2020, 12(12), 5111; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12125111
Received: 24 May 2020 / Revised: 11 June 2020 / Accepted: 18 June 2020 / Published: 23 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Resources and Sustainable Utilization)
The present decade of Sustainable Development Goals has influenced higher educational institutions to assess and harness their great potential for waste diversion, recovery, and recycling. Institutional solid waste management in South Africa as a developing economy is yet to receive the required attention compared to developed countries. The measurement of the characteristics, and composition of solid waste is a fundamental pre-requisite towards creating a sustainable and viable process of solid waste management systems across institutions as this provides adequate and reliable information on the waste generated. This study aimed to determine the variations of waste components in the University of Venda (UNIVEN) by characterisation of the waste generated. Solid waste samples were collected from key activity areas and characterised using the ASTM D5321-92 method for unprocessed municipal solid waste. The recyclable, compostable, and non-recoverable components of the waste generated were found to be 61.7%, 34.4%, and 3.9%, respectively. The results of the waste audit revealed a strong potential for recycling in the institution (61.7%). This would decrease the amount of waste sent to landfills and enable the monetisation of the recyclable waste recovered from the waste stream, in this manner prompting a circular economy and a sustainable campus thereby lowering the waste footprint of higher education institutions. View Full-Text
Keywords: higher education institution; recycling; waste generation; solid waste management; sustainable institutional waste management higher education institution; recycling; waste generation; solid waste management; sustainable institutional waste management
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MDPI and ACS Style

Owojori, O.; Edokpayi, J.N.; Mulaudzi, R.; Odiyo, J.O. Characterisation, Recovery and Recycling Potential of Solid Waste in a University of a Developing Economy. Sustainability 2020, 12, 5111. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12125111

AMA Style

Owojori O, Edokpayi JN, Mulaudzi R, Odiyo JO. Characterisation, Recovery and Recycling Potential of Solid Waste in a University of a Developing Economy. Sustainability. 2020; 12(12):5111. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12125111

Chicago/Turabian Style

Owojori, Oluwatobi, Joshua N. Edokpayi, Ratshalingwa Mulaudzi, and John O. Odiyo 2020. "Characterisation, Recovery and Recycling Potential of Solid Waste in a University of a Developing Economy" Sustainability 12, no. 12: 5111. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12125111

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