Next Article in Journal
Research on Drilling Response Characteristics of Two-Wing PDC Bit
Next Article in Special Issue
Money, Vouchers, Public Infrastructures? A Framework for Sustainable Welfare Benefits
Previous Article in Journal
Regionalization of Agricultural Nonpoint Source Pollution over China with a Combination of Qualitative and Quantitative Method
Previous Article in Special Issue
The Virtuous Circle of Sustainable Welfare as a Transformative Policy Idea
Article

Eco-Social Divides in Europe: Public Attitudes towards Welfare and Climate Change Policies

Centre for Sociological Research, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, 3000 Leuven, Belgium
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2020, 12(1), 404; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12010404
Received: 1 December 2019 / Revised: 29 December 2019 / Accepted: 2 January 2020 / Published: 4 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Welfare beyond Growth)
In the face of accelerating global warming and attendant natural disasters, it is clear that governments all over the world eventually have to take measures to mitigate the most adverse consequences of climate change. However, the costs of these measures are likely to force governments to reconsider some of their tax and spending priorities, of which social spending is the largest expenditure item in developed welfare states. Unless carried out in a way that is considered as fair by most citizens, such trade-off is likely to add a new, ecological dimension to the existing social cleavages in people’s preferences for public provision. Whether or not the possible tensions between the two sets of policies have already resulted in the emergence of a new, eco-social divide in Europe is an open question. In this paper, we hypothesise that there are four distinct attitude groups in relation to welfare and climate change policies, and that the probability of belonging to any of these groups is influenced by individuals’ socioeconomic and ideological characteristics, as well as the country context in which they live. We test our hypotheses using data from the eighth round of the European Social Survey conducted in 2016/17 in multinomial regression models. Results suggest that across Europe people are considerably divided in their support of public welfare and climate policies, but that support for both dimensions is highest in the Nordic countries. At the micro level, we find political ideology and trust in public institutions to be the most important drivers of a newly emerging eco-social divide. View Full-Text
Keywords: social welfare; environmental sustainability; sustainable welfare; eco-social policies; ESS; multilevel multinomial regression social welfare; environmental sustainability; sustainable welfare; eco-social policies; ESS; multilevel multinomial regression
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Otto, A.; Gugushvili, D. Eco-Social Divides in Europe: Public Attitudes towards Welfare and Climate Change Policies. Sustainability 2020, 12, 404. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12010404

AMA Style

Otto A, Gugushvili D. Eco-Social Divides in Europe: Public Attitudes towards Welfare and Climate Change Policies. Sustainability. 2020; 12(1):404. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12010404

Chicago/Turabian Style

Otto, Adeline; Gugushvili, Dimitri. 2020. "Eco-Social Divides in Europe: Public Attitudes towards Welfare and Climate Change Policies" Sustainability 12, no. 1: 404. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12010404

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop