Next Article in Journal
Evolution of Land Cover and Ecosystem Services in the Frame of Pastoral Functional Categories: A Case Study in Swedish Lapland
Next Article in Special Issue
Evolution of Policy Concerning the Readjustment of Inefficient Urban Land Use in China Based on a Content Analysis Method
Previous Article in Journal
Predicting Nurses Burnout through Quality of Work Life and Psychological Empowerment: A Study Towards Sustainable Healthcare Services in Malaysia
Previous Article in Special Issue
What Is the Critical Factor and Relationship of Urban Regeneration in a Historic District?: A Case of the Nanluoguxiang Area in Beijing, China
Article

The Impact of Urban Form and Spatial Structure on per Capita Carbon Footprint in U.S. Larger Metropolitan Areas

1
Department of Applied Economics, Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona, Spain
2
School of Economics, Universidad Sergio Arboleda, 110221 Bogotá, Colombia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2020, 12(1), 389; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12010389
Received: 18 October 2019 / Revised: 23 December 2019 / Accepted: 27 December 2019 / Published: 3 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Regeneration and Sustainable Urban Development)
Different studies have estimated cities’ contribution to total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions at between forty and seventy percent. According to the so-called Compact City Approach, high density and centrality should lead to low GHG. This study compares the effect of the urban density and spatial structure (monocentrism, polycentrism, and dispersion) of the main U.S. cities on their greenhouse gas emissions from mobility and housing. The estimated models include control variables in order to improve the statistical adjustment, these variables are grouped into three categories: basic controls as temperature and Gross Domestic Product (GDP); historical-demographic controls since 1900; and geographic-urban planning controls. The results detect an environmentally positive effect, albeit a moderate one, associated with monocentric and polycentric spatial structures as compared to dispersed structures. Within the tradition of urban planning, these results can be used as an argument to stop the dispersed decentralization of cities. However, the efficacy of some policies encouraging density should be accompanied by specific policies which increase the energy efficiency of housing and promote the use of public transport. View Full-Text
Keywords: urban density; spatial structure; greenhouse gas emissions urban density; spatial structure; greenhouse gas emissions
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Muñiz, I.; Dominguez, A. The Impact of Urban Form and Spatial Structure on per Capita Carbon Footprint in U.S. Larger Metropolitan Areas. Sustainability 2020, 12, 389. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12010389

AMA Style

Muñiz I, Dominguez A. The Impact of Urban Form and Spatial Structure on per Capita Carbon Footprint in U.S. Larger Metropolitan Areas. Sustainability. 2020; 12(1):389. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12010389

Chicago/Turabian Style

Muñiz, Ivan, and Andrés Dominguez. 2020. "The Impact of Urban Form and Spatial Structure on per Capita Carbon Footprint in U.S. Larger Metropolitan Areas" Sustainability 12, no. 1: 389. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12010389

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop