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Sustainability 2019, 11(8), 2251; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11082251

Thermal Comfort and Longwave Radiation over Time in Urban Residential Complexes

1
Interdisciplinary Program in Landscape Architecture, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826, Korea
2
Department of Landscape Architecture and Rural System Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 25 February 2019 / Revised: 20 March 2019 / Accepted: 23 March 2019 / Published: 15 April 2019
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Abstract

Large cities with a high concentration of high-rise buildings are shaded by urban canyon. This brings a cooling effect compared to the space exposed to the sun, but is not always cool due to the longwave radiation emitted from buildings and the built environment. We tested the micro-scale effects of major external spatial factors, trees, and buildings, under shade on longwave radiation shifts to understand the effects of large shaded areas in megacities. Incoming and outgoing longwave radiations (ILR and OLR, respectively) were found to decrease the overall observation by time zone. Longwave radiation on a micro-scale was also inversely proportional to the tree volume. From mean radiant temperature (MRT) analysis, we found that about a 10% decrease in MRT could be achieved by increasing tree volume by around 50%. Larger tree volumes corresponded to greater blocking effects on longwave radiation. Considering the tree volume, a multilayer urban tree canopy composition can more favorably improve the thermal environment and energy sustainability of a city compared to a single-layer canopy. Larger trees planted with harmonious shrubs are the most effective in reducing longwave radiation. View Full-Text
Keywords: thermal comfort; mean radiant temperature; tree volume; energy balance; longwave radiation thermal comfort; mean radiant temperature; tree volume; energy balance; longwave radiation
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Kwon, Y.J.; Lee, D.K. Thermal Comfort and Longwave Radiation over Time in Urban Residential Complexes. Sustainability 2019, 11, 2251.

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