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Sustainability 2019, 11(2), 509; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11020509

Residual Biomass from Dutch Riverine Areas—From Waste to Ecosystem Service

1
Institute for Science in Society, Faculty of Science, Radboud University Nijmegen, 6500 GL Nijmegen, The Netherlands
2
Rijkswaterstaat Oost-Nederland, Eusebiusbuitensingel 66, 6828 HZ Arnhem, The Netherlands
3
Institute for Management Research, Radboud University Nijmegen, 6500 HK Nijmegen, The Netherlands
Both authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 11 December 2018 / Revised: 15 January 2019 / Accepted: 16 January 2019 / Published: 18 January 2019
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Abstract

Dutch riverine areas are managed intensively to ensure the provision of various ecosystem services. Vegetation management, including pruning and mowing, produces a woody and grassy biomass as a by-product. In the past, this residual biomass has been treated as a waste product. Now there is a change of perspective; biomass is valued as a potential additional ecosystem service instead of a waste product. In this study, we explore the transition from waste to ecosystem service of residual biomass in Dutch water management organisations. We found several trends in the organisation of biomass use. There is a development away from the traditional approach of choosing the cheapest or easiest way to get rid of biomass towards exploring various uses of biomass that fulfil additional, societally relevant, functions. This trend alters the organisation of vegetation management and subsequent biomass use. Selection based on sustainable biomass uses is gaining importance, and there is a growing desire within public organisations to be able to steer towards sustainable use of residual biomass. However, there is a lack of applicable, objective ranking instruments. View Full-Text
Keywords: biomass as ecosystem service; residual biomass; vegetation management; water management; river ecosystem services biomass as ecosystem service; residual biomass; vegetation management; water management; river ecosystem services
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Bout, A.E.; Pfau, S.F.; van der Krabben, E.; Dankbaar, B. Residual Biomass from Dutch Riverine Areas—From Waste to Ecosystem Service. Sustainability 2019, 11, 509.

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