Next Article in Journal
Experimentalist Governance to Foster Cooperation in the Baltic Sea Region: A Focus on the Turku Process
Next Article in Special Issue
On the Necessity of Banning the Term “Heavy Metal” from the Scientific Literature
Previous Article in Journal
Fast Identification of Urban Sprawl Based on K-Means Clustering with Population Density and Local Spatial Entropy
Previous Article in Special Issue
Regionalized Terrestrial Ecotoxicity Assessment of Copper-Based Fungicides Applied in Viticulture
Open AccessArticle

Effect of Pig and Cattle Slurry Application on Heavy Metal Composition of Maize Grown on Different Soils

Department of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, University of Milan, 20133 Milan, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2018, 10(8), 2684; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10082684
Received: 29 June 2018 / Revised: 25 July 2018 / Accepted: 30 July 2018 / Published: 31 July 2018
Cattle and pig manure contain useful mineral nutrients (N, P, and K) and are therefore used as organic fertilizer. However, excessive applications of manure can cause environmental problems and threaten animal and human health because these materials also hold significant amounts of heavy metals, particularly Cu and Zn. To assess the potential risk due to the increased concentrations of heavy metals (Cu, Mn, Zn, and Cr) in a harvested crop, two maize hybrids were grown in pots on four different soils with three different fertilisers (urea, pig manure, and cattle manure). Both soil and manure characteristics influenced the heavy metal concentrations in the plant shoots. Organic fertilisation strongly interacted with the soils and, in general, reduced the shoot content of Cu, Mn, and Zn. A preliminary assessment of the heavy metal balance of the agricultural systems based on the intensive livestock production and maize cultivation showed that the potential soil enrichment of the long-term application of livestock manure arises mainly from the application of pig slurries that have a high content of Cu and Zn. The time required to apply an amount of metal that is equal to the initial soil content is 60–300 years for Zn and 240–450 years for Cu, depending on the soil type and the initial heavy metal content. View Full-Text
Keywords: Nutrient recycling; Food chain; Land application; Plant uptake; Livestock manure Nutrient recycling; Food chain; Land application; Plant uptake; Livestock manure
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Provolo, G.; Manuli, G.; Finzi, A.; Lucchini, G.; Riva, E.; Sacchi, G.A. Effect of Pig and Cattle Slurry Application on Heavy Metal Composition of Maize Grown on Different Soils. Sustainability 2018, 10, 2684. https://doi.org/10.3390/su10082684

AMA Style

Provolo G, Manuli G, Finzi A, Lucchini G, Riva E, Sacchi GA. Effect of Pig and Cattle Slurry Application on Heavy Metal Composition of Maize Grown on Different Soils. Sustainability. 2018; 10(8):2684. https://doi.org/10.3390/su10082684

Chicago/Turabian Style

Provolo, Giorgio; Manuli, Giulia; Finzi, Alberto; Lucchini, Giorgio; Riva, Elisabetta; Sacchi, Gian A. 2018. "Effect of Pig and Cattle Slurry Application on Heavy Metal Composition of Maize Grown on Different Soils" Sustainability 10, no. 8: 2684. https://doi.org/10.3390/su10082684

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop