Next Article in Journal
The Distribution of Residual Controls and Risk Sharing: A Case Study of Farmland Transfer in China
Next Article in Special Issue
Guidance on the Conceptual Design of Sustainable Product–Service Systems
Previous Article in Journal
Comprehensive Value Discovery of Land Consolidation Projects: An Empirical Analysis of Shanghai, China
Open AccessArticle

Socially-Inclusive Development and Value Creation: How a Composting Project in Galicia (Spain) ‘Hit the Rocks’

1
Department of Applied Economics, Faculty of Business and Tourism, University of Vigo, Campus Universitario As Lagoas s/n, 32004 Ourense, Spain
2
Governance and Economics research Network (GEN), University of Vigo, Campus Universitario As Lagoas s/n, 32004 Ourense, Spain
3
Department of Applied Economics, Public Economics and Political Economy, Faculty of Social Work, Complutense University of Madrid, Campus de Somosaguas, 28223 Pozuelo de Alarcón, Spain
4
Rural Sociology Group, Department of Social Sciences, Wageningen University, Hollandseweg 1, 6706 KN Wageningen, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2018, 10(6), 2040; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10062040
Received: 10 April 2018 / Revised: 6 June 2018 / Accepted: 11 June 2018 / Published: 15 June 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovations in the Circular Economy: Commons or Commodity?)
  |  
PDF [976 KB, uploaded 21 January 2019]
  |  

Abstract

This paper introduces the concept of commoning in circular economies, and explores how commons reproduce over time. The starting point is that commoning can have an important role in fostering circular economies and sustainable and socially-inclusive development. By commoning, we refer to local stakeholders working collectively to preserve or restore their natural resource base to generate benefits that are locally shared. Through the analysis of a specific case of a group of commoners’ associations in Galicia (Spain), the paper describes and discusses the development, and ultimate unravelling, of an innovative and decentralized waste management project to convert waste biomass from the monte (often-neglected upland green spaces, largely consisting of brush and trees) into compost. In order to make this composting project economically viable the possibility of collecting and processing urban green waste was also explored. While the project’s application of the principles of a circular economy had the potential to bring locally-shared economic and ecological benefits, and foster territorial prosperity and resilience, it was ultimately frustrated by questions of scale, administrative and regulatory barriers, competing and conflicting land-use claims and financial cutbacks in the public sector. View Full-Text
Keywords: Galicia; circular economy; commoning; decentralized waste management; social innovation Galicia; circular economy; commoning; decentralized waste management; social innovation
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Swagemakers, P.; Dominguez Garcia, M.D.; Wiskerke, J.S.C. Socially-Inclusive Development and Value Creation: How a Composting Project in Galicia (Spain) ‘Hit the Rocks’. Sustainability 2018, 10, 2040.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Sustainability EISSN 2071-1050 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top