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About Linda Again: How Narratives and Group Reasoning Can Influence Conjunction Fallacy

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Department of Education, Literatures, Intercultures, Languages and Psychology, University of Florence, 50135 Florence, Italy
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Department of Neurosciences, Psychology, Drug Research, and Child Health, University of Florence, 50135 Florence, Italy
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Future Internet 2019, 11(10), 210; https://doi.org/10.3390/fi11100210
Received: 23 August 2019 / Revised: 2 October 2019 / Accepted: 2 October 2019 / Published: 8 October 2019
Conjunction fallacy (together with other systematic reasoning errors) is usually explained in terms of the dual process theory of reasoning: Biases should be ascribed to fast and automatic processes, whereas slow and deliberative processes are responsible of producing answers that are correct with respect of normative criterion. The dual process theory is related to Bruner’s distinction between narrative and paradigmatic thought: Both modes of thought can be characterized by the two different processes of reasoning. In this paper, we explore the role of Bruner’s mode of thought manipulating also the difference between group vs individual reasoning. We observed that the narrative strategy of response induces more wrong answers. However, narrative-based strategies have higher effectiveness in the case of group reasoning. Our results suggest that narrative reasoning and group reasoning may induce violations of the conjunction rule when acceptable by the verisimilitude of the story. Five models are also presented in order to predict answer correctness and strategy of reasoning using a text analysis software. View Full-Text
Keywords: conjunction fallacy; narrative thought; dual-process; group reasoning conjunction fallacy; narrative thought; dual-process; group reasoning
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Donati, C.; Guazzini, A.; Gronchi, G.; Smorti, A. About Linda Again: How Narratives and Group Reasoning Can Influence Conjunction Fallacy. Future Internet 2019, 11, 210.

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