Next Article in Journal
Assessments of the In Vitro and In Vivo Linker Stability and Catabolic Fate for the Ortho Hydroxy-Protected Aryl Sulfate Linker by Immuno-Affinity Capture Liquid Chromatography Quadrupole Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometric Assay
Next Article in Special Issue
Assessing the Mechanism of Fluoxetine-Mediated CYP2D6 Inhibition
Previous Article in Journal
Quantitative Cryo-TEM Reveals New Structural Details of Doxil-Like PEGylated Liposomal Doxorubicin Formulation
Previous Article in Special Issue
Multifaceted Factors Causing Conflicting Outcomes in Herb-Drug Interactions
Open AccessReview

Potential Herb–Drug Interactions in the Management of Age-Related Cognitive Dysfunction

1
CiiEM, Interdisciplinary Research Centre Egas Moniz, Instituto Universitário Egas Moniz, Quinta da Granja, Monte de Caparica, 2829-511 Caparica, Portugal
2
Polytechnic Institute of Santarém, School of Agriculture, Quinta do Galinheiro, 2001-904 Santarém, Portugal
3
CIEQV, Life Quality Research Centre, IPSantarém/IPLeiria, Avenida Dr. Mário Soares, 110, 2040-413 Rio Maior, Portugal
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Pharmaceutics 2021, 13(1), 124; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics13010124
Received: 23 December 2020 / Revised: 14 January 2021 / Accepted: 15 January 2021 / Published: 19 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pharmacokinetic Drug-Drug Interactions and Herb-Drug Interactions)
Late-life mild cognitive impairment and dementia represent a significant burden on healthcare systems and a unique challenge to medicine due to the currently limited treatment options. Plant phytochemicals have been considered in alternative, or complementary, prevention and treatment strategies. Herbals are consumed as such, or as food supplements, whose consumption has recently increased. However, these products are not exempt from adverse effects and pharmacological interactions, presenting a special risk in aged, polymedicated individuals. Understanding pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions is warranted to avoid undesirable adverse drug reactions, which may result in unwanted side-effects or therapeutic failure. The present study reviews the potential interactions between selected bioactive compounds (170) used by seniors for cognitive enhancement and representative drugs of 10 pharmacotherapeutic classes commonly prescribed to the middle-aged adults, often multimorbid and polymedicated, to anticipate and prevent risks arising from their co-administration. A literature review was conducted to identify mutual targets affected (inhibition/induction/substrate), the frequency of which was taken as a measure of potential interaction. Although a limited number of drugs were studied, from this work, interaction with other drugs affecting the same targets may be anticipated and prevented, constituting a valuable tool for healthcare professionals in clinical practice. View Full-Text
Keywords: herb–drug interactions; botanicals; food supplements; nootropics; phytochemicals; nutraceuticals; pharmacokinetics; cognitive dysfunction herb–drug interactions; botanicals; food supplements; nootropics; phytochemicals; nutraceuticals; pharmacokinetics; cognitive dysfunction
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Auxtero, M.D.; Chalante, S.; Abade, M.R.; Jorge, R.; Fernandes, A.I. Potential Herb–Drug Interactions in the Management of Age-Related Cognitive Dysfunction. Pharmaceutics 2021, 13, 124. https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics13010124

AMA Style

Auxtero MD, Chalante S, Abade MR, Jorge R, Fernandes AI. Potential Herb–Drug Interactions in the Management of Age-Related Cognitive Dysfunction. Pharmaceutics. 2021; 13(1):124. https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics13010124

Chicago/Turabian Style

Auxtero, Maria D.; Chalante, Susana; Abade, Mário R.; Jorge, Rui; Fernandes, Ana I. 2021. "Potential Herb–Drug Interactions in the Management of Age-Related Cognitive Dysfunction" Pharmaceutics 13, no. 1: 124. https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics13010124

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop