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Review

Evidence of Drug–Nutrient Interactions with Chronic Use of Commonly Prescribed Medications: An Update

1
Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging, and Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Tufts University, Boston, MA 02111, USA
2
Nutrition & Scientific Affairs, Nature’s Bounty Co., Ronkonkoma, NY 11779, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Pharmaceutics 2018, 10(1), 36; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics10010036
Received: 13 February 2018 / Revised: 13 March 2018 / Accepted: 16 March 2018 / Published: 20 March 2018
The long-term use of prescription and over-the-counter drugs can induce subclinical and clinically relevant micronutrient deficiencies, which may develop gradually over months or even years. Given the large number of medications currently available, the number of research studies examining potential drug–nutrient interactions is quite limited. A comprehensive, updated review of the potential drug–nutrient interactions with chronic use of the most often prescribed medications for commonly diagnosed conditions among the general U.S. adult population is presented. For the majority of the interactions described in this paper, more high-quality intervention trials are needed to better understand their clinical importance and potential consequences. A number of these studies have identified potential risk factors that may make certain populations more susceptible, but guidelines on how to best manage and/or prevent drug-induced nutrient inadequacies are lacking. Although widespread supplementation is not currently recommended, it is important to ensure at-risk patients reach their recommended intakes for vitamins and minerals. In conjunction with an overall healthy diet, appropriate dietary supplementation may be a practical and efficacious way to maintain or improve micronutrient status in patients at risk of deficiencies, such as those taking medications known to compromise nutritional status. The summary evidence presented in this review will help inform future research efforts and, ultimately, guide recommendations for patient care. View Full-Text
Keywords: drug–nutrient interaction; micronutrient deficiencies; nutrient inadequacies; multivitamin; dietary supplement drug–nutrient interaction; micronutrient deficiencies; nutrient inadequacies; multivitamin; dietary supplement
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MDPI and ACS Style

Mohn, E.S.; Kern, H.J.; Saltzman, E.; Mitmesser, S.H.; McKay, D.L. Evidence of Drug–Nutrient Interactions with Chronic Use of Commonly Prescribed Medications: An Update. Pharmaceutics 2018, 10, 36. https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics10010036

AMA Style

Mohn ES, Kern HJ, Saltzman E, Mitmesser SH, McKay DL. Evidence of Drug–Nutrient Interactions with Chronic Use of Commonly Prescribed Medications: An Update. Pharmaceutics. 2018; 10(1):36. https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics10010036

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mohn, Emily S., Hua J. Kern, Edward Saltzman, Susan H. Mitmesser, and Diane L. McKay 2018. "Evidence of Drug–Nutrient Interactions with Chronic Use of Commonly Prescribed Medications: An Update" Pharmaceutics 10, no. 1: 36. https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics10010036

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