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Open AccessReview

Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis Affects Plant Immunity to Viral Infection and Accumulation

1
State Key Laboratory of Urban and Regional Ecology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085, China
2
University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Viruses 2019, 11(6), 534; https://doi.org/10.3390/v11060534
Received: 28 April 2019 / Revised: 4 June 2019 / Accepted: 6 June 2019 / Published: 8 June 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Immunity to Virus Infections)
Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, as root symbionts of most terrestrial plants, improve plant growth and fitness. In addition to the improved plant nutritional status, the physiological changes that trigger metabolic changes in the root via AM fungi can also increase the host ability to overcome biotic and abiotic stresses. Plant viruses are one of the important limiting factors for the commercial cultivation of various crops. The effect of AM fungi on viral infection is variable, and considerable attention is focused on shoot virus infection. This review provides an overview of the potential of AM fungi as bioprotection agents against viral diseases and emphasizes the complex nature of plant–fungus–virus interactions. Several mechanisms, including modulated plant tolerance, manipulation of induced systemic resistance (ISR), and altered vector pressure are involved in such interactions. We propose that using “omics” tools will provide detailed insights into the complex mechanisms underlying mycorrhizal-mediated plant immunity. View Full-Text
Keywords: mycorrhiza; immune priming; virus-responsive genes; root colonization; symptom severity mycorrhiza; immune priming; virus-responsive genes; root colonization; symptom severity
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MDPI and ACS Style

Hao, Z.; Xie, W.; Chen, B. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis Affects Plant Immunity to Viral Infection and Accumulation. Viruses 2019, 11, 534.

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