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Article

Effect of Gap Position on the Heavy Metal Contents of Epiphytic Mosses and Lichens on the Fallen Logs and Standing Trees in an Alpine Forest

Long-Term*Research Station of Alpine Forest Ecosystems, Provincial Key Laboratory of Ecological Forestry Engineering, Institute of Ecology and Forestry, Sichuan Agricultural University, 211 Huimin Road, Wenjiang District, Chengdu 611130, Sichuan, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Forests 2018, 9(7), 383; https://doi.org/10.3390/f9070383
Received: 27 April 2018 / Revised: 26 May 2018 / Accepted: 11 June 2018 / Published: 27 June 2018
(This article belongs to the Section Forest Ecology and Management)
To understand the role of the forest gaps and epiphytic mosses and lichens in the heavy metal cycles of forest ecosystems, the biomass, concentration, and storage of Cd, Pb, Cu, and Zn in epiphytic mosses and lichens on fallen logs and standing trees from the gap center to the closed canopy of an alpine forest ecosystem on the eastern Tibetan Plateau were investigated. Mosses were the dominant epiphytes on fallen logs and standing trees and contribute 82.1–95.1% of total epiphyte biomass in the alpine forest. A significantly higher biomass of epiphytic mosses and lichens was observed at the gap edge. The heavy metals concentration in mosses and lichens on fallen logs and standing trees varied widely with gap positions. Lower concentrations of Cd, Cu, and Pb were found in the mosses and lichens under the closed canopy, higher concentrations of Cd and Pb were detected in the mosses and lichens at the gap edge, and higher concentrations of Cu were found at the gap center. A significant difference in Zn concentration was observed between the mosses and lichens. No significant differences in Pb or Zn concentrations were observed in the mosses and lichens between the fallen log and standing tree substrates. Furthermore, the epiphytic mosses and lichens at the gap edge accumulated more Cd, Pb, and Cu, whereas the epiphytic lichens on the fallen logs and large shrubs at the gap center accumulated more Zn. In conclusion, gap regeneration accelerates the cycling of heavy metals in alpine forest ecosystems by promoting the growth of epiphytic mosses and lichens on fallen logs and standing trees at gap edges and increasing the concentration of heavy metals in these plants. View Full-Text
Keywords: coarse woody debris; heavy metal accumulation; epiphytic moss; epiphytic lichen; gap regeneration coarse woody debris; heavy metal accumulation; epiphytic moss; epiphytic lichen; gap regeneration
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MDPI and ACS Style

Wang, Z.; Wu, F.; Yang, W.; Tan, B.; Chang, C.; Wang, Q.; Cao, R.; Tang, G. Effect of Gap Position on the Heavy Metal Contents of Epiphytic Mosses and Lichens on the Fallen Logs and Standing Trees in an Alpine Forest. Forests 2018, 9, 383. https://doi.org/10.3390/f9070383

AMA Style

Wang Z, Wu F, Yang W, Tan B, Chang C, Wang Q, Cao R, Tang G. Effect of Gap Position on the Heavy Metal Contents of Epiphytic Mosses and Lichens on the Fallen Logs and Standing Trees in an Alpine Forest. Forests. 2018; 9(7):383. https://doi.org/10.3390/f9070383

Chicago/Turabian Style

Wang, Zhuang, Fuzhong Wu, Wanqin Yang, Bo Tan, Chenhui Chang, Qin Wang, Rui Cao, and Guoqing Tang. 2018. "Effect of Gap Position on the Heavy Metal Contents of Epiphytic Mosses and Lichens on the Fallen Logs and Standing Trees in an Alpine Forest" Forests 9, no. 7: 383. https://doi.org/10.3390/f9070383

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