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Forests 2018, 9(3), 105; https://doi.org/10.3390/f9030105

Pathogenicity of Neonectria fuckeliana on Norway Spruce Clones in Sweden and Potential Management Strategies

1
Southern Swedish Forest Research Centre, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 49, SE-23053 Alnarp, Sweden
2
Division of Biotecnology and Plant Health, Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research (NIBIO), P.O. Box 115, 1431 Ås, Norway
3
Department of Forestry and Environmental Resources, North Carolina State University, 2800 Faucette Dr., Raleigh, NC 27695, USA
4
The Forestry Research Institute of Sweden (Skogforsk), Ekebo 2250, SE-26890 Svalöv, Sweden
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 8 February 2018 / Revised: 23 February 2018 / Accepted: 27 February 2018 / Published: 28 February 2018
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Abstract

The fungus Neonectria fuckeliana has become an increasing problem on Norway spruce (Picea abies) in the Nordic countries during recent years. Canker wounds caused by the pathogen reduce timber quality and top-dieback is a problem for the Christmas tree industry. In this study, four inoculation trials were conducted to examine the ability of N. fuckeliana to cause disease on young Norway spruce plants and determine how different wound types would affect the occurrence and severity of the disease. Symptom development after 8–11 months was mainly mild and lesion lengths under bark were generally minor. However, N. fuckeliana could still be reisolated and/or molecularly detected. Slow disease development is in line with older studies describing N. fuckeliana as a weak pathogen. However, the results do not explain the serious increased damage by N. fuckeliana registered in Nordic forests and Christmas tree plantations. Potential management implications, such as shearing Christmas trees during periods of low inoculum pressure, cleaning secateurs between trees, and removal and burning of diseased branches and trees to avoid inoculum transfer and to keep disease pressure low, are based on experiments presented here and experiences with related pathogens. View Full-Text
Keywords: Picea abies; Nordic countries; canker; microconidia; inoculation; lesion length; infection Picea abies; Nordic countries; canker; microconidia; inoculation; lesion length; infection
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Pettersson, M.; Talgø, V.; Frampton, J.; Karlsson, B.; Rönnberg, J. Pathogenicity of Neonectria fuckeliana on Norway Spruce Clones in Sweden and Potential Management Strategies. Forests 2018, 9, 105.

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