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Forests 2018, 9(10), 592; https://doi.org/10.3390/f9100592

Strategies for Climate-Smart Forest Management in Austria

1
Department of Forest Ecology and Soils, Austrian Research Center for Forests (BFW), 1131 Vienna, Austria
2
Department of Forest Growth and Silviculture, Austrian Research Center for Forests (BFW), 1131 Vienna, Austria
3
Department of Forest Inventory, Austrian Research Center for Forests (BFW), 1131 Vienna, Austria
4
Umweltbundesamt, 1090 Vienna, Austria
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 29 August 2018 / Revised: 19 September 2018 / Accepted: 20 September 2018 / Published: 22 September 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Smart Forestry)
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Abstract

We simulated Austrian forests under different sustainable management scenarios. A reference scenario was compared to scenarios focusing on the provision of bioenergy, enhancing the delivery of wood products, and reduced harvesting rates. The standing stock of the stem biomass, carbon in stems, and the soil carbon pool were calculated for the period 2010–2100. We used the forest growth model Câldis and the soil carbon model Yasso07. The wood demand of all scenarios could be satisfied within the simulation period. The reference scenario led to a small decrease of the stem biomass. Scenarios aiming at a supply of more timber decreased the standing stock to a greater extent. Emphasizing the production of bioenergy was successful for several decades but ultimately exhausted the available resources for fuel wood. Lower harvesting rates reduced the standing stock of coniferous and increased the standing stock of deciduous forests. The soil carbon pool was marginally changed by different management strategies. We conclude that the production of long-living wood products is the preferred implementation of climate-smart forestry. The accumulation of carbon in the standing biomass is risky in the case of disturbances. The production of bioenergy is suitable as a byproduct of high value forest products. View Full-Text
Keywords: carbon sequestration; forest management; simulation of aboveground stem biomass and soil; soil carbon; climate smart forestry carbon sequestration; forest management; simulation of aboveground stem biomass and soil; soil carbon; climate smart forestry
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Jandl, R.; Ledermann, T.; Kindermann, G.; Freudenschuss, A.; Gschwantner, T.; Weiss, P. Strategies for Climate-Smart Forest Management in Austria. Forests 2018, 9, 592.

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