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Forest Management Challenges for Sustaining Water Resources in the Anthropocene
Open AccessArticle

Long-Term Forest Paired Catchment Studies: What Do They Tell Us That Landscape-Level Monitoring Does Not?

USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, 2500 South Pine Knoll Drive, Flagstaff, AZ 86001, USA
Academic Editors: Ge Sun and James M. Vose
Forests 2016, 7(8), 164; https://doi.org/10.3390/f7080164
Received: 15 December 2015 / Revised: 15 July 2016 / Accepted: 22 July 2016 / Published: 29 July 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Forest Management and Water Resources in the Anthropocene)
Forested catchments throughout the world are known for producing high quality water for human use. In the 20th Century, experimental forest catchment studies played a key role in studying the processes contributing to high water quality. The hydrologic processes investigated on these paired catchments have provided the science base for examining water quality responses to natural disturbances such as wildfire, insect outbreaks, and extreme hydrologic events, and human-induced disturbances such as timber harvesting, site preparation, prescribed fires, fertilizer applications, pesticide usage, rainfall acidification, and mining. This paper compares and contrasts the paired catchment approach with landscape-level water resource monitoring to highlight the information on hydrologic processes provided by the paired catchment approach that is not provided by the broad-brush landscape monitoring. View Full-Text
Keywords: forest catchments; long-term studies; monitoring; water quantity; water quality forest catchments; long-term studies; monitoring; water quantity; water quality
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MDPI and ACS Style

Neary, D.G. Long-Term Forest Paired Catchment Studies: What Do They Tell Us That Landscape-Level Monitoring Does Not? Forests 2016, 7, 164.

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