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Emerging Diseases in European Forest Ecosystems and Responses in Society

BioCenter, Department of Forest Mycology and Plant Pathology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, PO Box 7026, SE-750 07 Uppsala, Sweden
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Forests 2011, 2(2), 486-504; https://doi.org/10.3390/f2020486
Received: 18 January 2011 / Revised: 3 March 2011 / Accepted: 3 March 2011 / Published: 4 April 2011
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Future Forests)
New diseases in forest ecosystems have been reported at an increasing rate over the last century. Some reasons for this include the increased disturbance by humans to forest ecosystems, changed climatic conditions and intensified international trade. Although many of the contributing factors to the changed disease scenarios are anthropogenic, there has been a reluctance to control them by legislation, other forms of government authority or through public involvement. Some of the primary obstacles relate to problems in communicating biological understanding of concepts to the political sphere of society. Relevant response to new disease scenarios is very often associated with a proper understanding of intraspecific variation in the challenging pathogen. Other factors could be technical, based on a lack of understanding of possible countermeasures. There are also philosophical reasons, such as the view that forests are part of the natural ecosystems and should not be managed for natural disturbances such as disease outbreaks. Finally, some of the reasons are economic or political, such as a belief in free trade or reluctance to acknowledge supranational intervention control. Our possibilities to act in response to new disease threats are critically dependent on the timing of efforts. A common recognition of the nature of the problem and adapting vocabulary that describe relevant biological entities would help to facilitate timely and adequate responses in society to emerging diseases in forests. View Full-Text
Keywords: biosecurity; communicating biological concepts; forest health; global change; invasive pathogens; legislation; pathway analysis; species concepts biosecurity; communicating biological concepts; forest health; global change; invasive pathogens; legislation; pathway analysis; species concepts
MDPI and ACS Style

Stenlid, J.; Oliva, J.; Boberg, J.B.; Hopkins, A.J.M. Emerging Diseases in European Forest Ecosystems and Responses in Society. Forests 2011, 2, 486-504. https://doi.org/10.3390/f2020486

AMA Style

Stenlid J, Oliva J, Boberg JB, Hopkins AJM. Emerging Diseases in European Forest Ecosystems and Responses in Society. Forests. 2011; 2(2):486-504. https://doi.org/10.3390/f2020486

Chicago/Turabian Style

Stenlid, Jan; Oliva, Jonàs; Boberg, Johanna B.; Hopkins, Anna J.M. 2011. "Emerging Diseases in European Forest Ecosystems and Responses in Society" Forests 2, no. 2: 486-504. https://doi.org/10.3390/f2020486

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