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Article

Alien vs. Native—Influence of Fallow Deer (Dama dama) Introduction on the Native Roe Deer (Capreolus capreolus) Population

by
Jakub Gryz
1,
Dagny Krauze-Gryz
2,* and
Karolina D. Jasińska
2
1
Department of Forest Ecology, Forest Research Institute, Braci Leśnej 3, Sękocin Stary, 05-090 Raszyn, Poland
2
Department of Forest Zoology and Wildlife Management, Institute of Forest Sciences, Warsaw University of Life Sciences WULS-SGGW, Nowoursynowska 159, 02-776 Warsaw, Poland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Forests 2024, 15(6), 1014; https://doi.org/10.3390/f15061014
Submission received: 24 April 2024 / Revised: 6 June 2024 / Accepted: 7 June 2024 / Published: 11 June 2024
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wildlife Ecology and Conservation in Forest Habitats)

Abstract

Fallow deer is one of the most widespread alien mammals in Europe. We documented the response of the roe deer population shortly after the fallow deer was introduced to a hunting ground in central Poland. Mean roe density dropped from 17.6 ind./100 ha to 10.5 ind./100 ha after the alien species was introduced. In the reference area, where fallow deer was absent, the roe deer density did not change in the analogue study period. At both study sites, mean roe deer productivity before fallow deer introduction was similar (1.6 juv./female). However, in the first study area, the productivity dropped to 1.4, while in the reference study area, it slightly increased to 1.75. The presence of fallow deer influenced roe deer space use negatively, i.e., the number of pellet groups of roe deer decreased with an increase in the number of fallow deer feces. Overall, the introduction of the fallow deer was successful and the population grew quickly. Yet, the economic impact of its introduction was far from satisfactory. At the same time, its negative influence on the roe deer was apparent. This shows that the fallow deer is an alien species threatening local biodiversity.
Keywords: alien invasive species; wildlife management; population density; reproduction rate; interspecific competition alien invasive species; wildlife management; population density; reproduction rate; interspecific competition

Share and Cite

MDPI and ACS Style

Gryz, J.; Krauze-Gryz, D.; Jasińska, K.D. Alien vs. Native—Influence of Fallow Deer (Dama dama) Introduction on the Native Roe Deer (Capreolus capreolus) Population. Forests 2024, 15, 1014. https://doi.org/10.3390/f15061014

AMA Style

Gryz J, Krauze-Gryz D, Jasińska KD. Alien vs. Native—Influence of Fallow Deer (Dama dama) Introduction on the Native Roe Deer (Capreolus capreolus) Population. Forests. 2024; 15(6):1014. https://doi.org/10.3390/f15061014

Chicago/Turabian Style

Gryz, Jakub, Dagny Krauze-Gryz, and Karolina D. Jasińska. 2024. "Alien vs. Native—Influence of Fallow Deer (Dama dama) Introduction on the Native Roe Deer (Capreolus capreolus) Population" Forests 15, no. 6: 1014. https://doi.org/10.3390/f15061014

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