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Article

Analysing the Impact of Harvesting Methods on the Quantity of Harvesting Residues: An Australian Case Study

1
Forest Industries Research Centre, University of the Sunshine Coast, Locked Bag 4, Maroochydore DC, Sunshine Coast, QLD 4558, Australia
2
Renewable Materials Research Centre, Department of Wood and Forest Sciences, Laval University, 2405 Terrasse Street, Quebec City, QC G1V 0A6, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Enrico Marchi
Forests 2021, 12(9), 1212; https://doi.org/10.3390/f12091212
Received: 27 July 2021 / Revised: 25 August 2021 / Accepted: 2 September 2021 / Published: 6 September 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability Assessments and Management of Woody Waste)
Many parameters can influence the weight of harvesting residues per hectare that remain on plantation sites after extracting sawlogs and pulpwoods. This study aimed at quantifying the impact of the cut-to-length and whole-tree harvesting methods on the weight of harvesting residues using 26 case studies in Australian plantations. A database was created using case studies conducted in different plantations, to measure the weight of harvesting residues per hectare and the components of harvesting residues. An analysis of variance was applied to test the impact made by the harvesting methods. The results confirmed that the cut-to-length harvesting method produced a larger weight of residues (104.0 tonnes of wet matter per hectare (tWM/ha) without additional biomass recovery and 64.7 tWM/ha with additional biomass recovery after sawlog/pulpwood extraction) than the whole-tree harvesting method (12.5 tWM/ha). The fraction test showed that stem wood formed the largest proportion of the harvesting residues in cut-to-length sites and needles were the largest component of the pine harvesting residues in sites cleared by the whole-tree harvesting method. The outcomes of this study could assist plantation managers to set proper strategies for harvesting residues management. Future research could study the impact of product type, silvicultural regime, stand quality, age, equipment, etc., on the weight of harvesting residues. View Full-Text
Keywords: harvesting method; residues; stem wood; branches; needles harvesting method; residues; stem wood; branches; needles
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ghaffariyan, M.R.; Dupuis, E. Analysing the Impact of Harvesting Methods on the Quantity of Harvesting Residues: An Australian Case Study. Forests 2021, 12, 1212. https://doi.org/10.3390/f12091212

AMA Style

Ghaffariyan MR, Dupuis E. Analysing the Impact of Harvesting Methods on the Quantity of Harvesting Residues: An Australian Case Study. Forests. 2021; 12(9):1212. https://doi.org/10.3390/f12091212

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ghaffariyan, Mohammad R., and Eloïse Dupuis. 2021. "Analysing the Impact of Harvesting Methods on the Quantity of Harvesting Residues: An Australian Case Study" Forests 12, no. 9: 1212. https://doi.org/10.3390/f12091212

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